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ChannelScience News Headlines - Yahoo News    
RSS File: http://rss.news.yahoo.com/rss/science
Description: Get the latest Science news headlines from Yahoo News. Find breaking Science news, including analysis and opinion on top Science stories.
  • Five teams vying for Google prize to land spacecraft on the moon      Tue, 24 Jan 2017 10:55:04 -0500

    The moon is seen during its final eclipse over Los AngelesBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Five teams have qualified to compete in a $30 million Google-backed competition to land and operate robotic spacecraft on the surface of the moon, the XPrize Foundation said on Tuesday. Previously, competitors needed to complete activities on the lunar surface, such as having their vehicles travel 1,640 feet (500 meters) and broadcast high-definition video, by the end of the year. Since the contest was announced in 2007, interest in the Google Lunar XPrize has been high, with 33 teams originally signing up to compete for the $20 million first prize.


    The moon is seen during its final eclipse over Los AngelesBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Five teams have qualified to compete in a $30 million Google-backed competition to land and operate robotic spacecraft on the surface of the moon, the XPrize Foundation said on Tuesday. Previously, competitors needed to complete activities on the lunar surface, such as having their vehicles travel 1,640 feet (500 meters) and broadcast high-definition video, by the end of the year. Since the contest was announced in 2007, interest in the Google Lunar XPrize has been high, with 33 teams originally signing up to compete for the $20 million first prize.


     
  • Small moth with yellowish coif named after Donald Trump      Fri, 20 Jan 2017 09:42:50 -0500

    Small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi and named after U.S. President-edit Donald Trump(Reuters) - A small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales has been named after U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, in honor of the former reality TV show host and real estate magnate's signature hairdo. The new species, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi, lives in a habitat that spans southern California and Mexico's Baja California and was named by evolutionary biologist Vazrick Nazari in an article published in the scientific journal ZooKeys. The moth, the second species of a genus of twirler moths, can be distinguished by the yellowish-white scales on the head of its adults, according to the journal.


    Small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi and named after U.S. President-edit Donald Trump(Reuters) - A small moth with a yellowish-white coif of scales has been named after U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, in honor of the former reality TV show host and real estate magnate's signature hairdo. The new species, dubbed Neopalpa donaldtrumpi, lives in a habitat that spans southern California and Mexico's Baja California and was named by evolutionary biologist Vazrick Nazari in an article published in the scientific journal ZooKeys. The moth, the second species of a genus of twirler moths, can be distinguished by the yellowish-white scales on the head of its adults, according to the journal.


     
  • Fossils of utterly huge otter unearthed in China      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 17:44:31 -0500

    Two Siamogale melilutra individuals, one feeding on a fresh water clam, are pictured in this artist illustration handout imageBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have unearthed fossils of an intriguingly large otter as big as a wolf that frolicked in rivers and lakes in a lush, warm and humid wetlands region in southwestern China about 6.2 million years ago. Who would have imagined a wolf-size otter?" said Denise Su, Cleveland Museum of Natural History curator of paleobotany and paleoecology. "I think it used its powerful jaws to crush hard clams for food, somewhat like modern sea otters, although the latter use stone tools to smash shells," said Xiaoming Wang, head of vertebrate paleontology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.


    Two Siamogale melilutra individuals, one feeding on a fresh water clam, are pictured in this artist illustration handout imageBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have unearthed fossils of an intriguingly large otter as big as a wolf that frolicked in rivers and lakes in a lush, warm and humid wetlands region in southwestern China about 6.2 million years ago. Who would have imagined a wolf-size otter?" said Denise Su, Cleveland Museum of Natural History curator of paleobotany and paleoecology. "I think it used its powerful jaws to crush hard clams for food, somewhat like modern sea otters, although the latter use stone tools to smash shells," said Xiaoming Wang, head of vertebrate paleontology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.


     
  • Scientists enter Hawaii dome in eight-month Mars space mission study      Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:29:44 -0500
    (Reuters) - Six scientists have entered a dome perched atop a remote volcano in Hawaii where they will spend the next eight months in isolation to simulate life for astronauts traveling to Mars, the University of Hawaii said. The study is designed to help NASA better understand human behavior and performance during long space missions as the U.S. space agency explores plans for a manned mission to the Red Planet. "I’m proud of the part we play in helping reduce the barriers to a human journey to Mars,” said Kim Binsted, the mission's principal investigator. 
  • World temperatures hit new high in 2016 for third year in a row      Wed, 18 Jan 2017 10:34:36 -0500

    FILE PHOTO: People cool off in fountains as hot summer temperatures hit ParisBy Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - World temperatures hit a record high for the third year in a row in 2016, creeping closer to a ceiling set for global warming with extremes including unprecedented heat in India and ice melt in the Arctic, U.S. government agencies said on Wednesday. The data, supported by findings from other organizations, was issued two days before the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, who questions whether climate change has a human cause. Average surface temperatures over land and the oceans in 2016 were 0.94 degrees Celsius (1.69 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 20th-century average of 13.9C (57.0F), according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


    FILE PHOTO: People cool off in fountains as hot summer temperatures hit ParisBy Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - World temperatures hit a record high for the third year in a row in 2016, creeping closer to a ceiling set for global warming with extremes including unprecedented heat in India and ice melt in the Arctic, U.S. government agencies said on Wednesday. The data, supported by findings from other organizations, was issued two days before the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, who questions whether climate change has a human cause. Average surface temperatures over land and the oceans in 2016 were 0.94 degrees Celsius (1.69 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 20th-century average of 13.9C (57.0F), according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


     
  • Evolution, Climate and Vaccines: Why Americans Deny Science      Tue, 24 Jan 2017 10:24:00 -0500

    Evolution, Climate and Vaccines: Why Americans Deny ScienceThose numbers, all gleaned from recent Pew and Gallup research polls, might suggest that Americans are an anti-science bunch. "The whole discussion around scientific denial has become very, very simplified," said Troy Campbell, a psychologist at the University of Oregon. The presentations are occurring today (Jan. 21) at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in San Antonio.


    Evolution, Climate and Vaccines: Why Americans Deny ScienceThose numbers, all gleaned from recent Pew and Gallup research polls, might suggest that Americans are an anti-science bunch. "The whole discussion around scientific denial has become very, very simplified," said Troy Campbell, a psychologist at the University of Oregon. The presentations are occurring today (Jan. 21) at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in San Antonio.


     
  • Ultrafast Camera Captures 'Sonic Booms' of Light for First Time      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 23:46:00 -0500

    Ultrafast Camera Captures 'Sonic Booms' of Light for First TimeJust as aircraft flying at supersonic speeds create cone-shaped sonic booms, pulses of light can leave behind cone-shaped wakes of light. When an object moves through air, it propels the air in front of it away, creating pressure waves that move at the speed of sound in all directions. If the object is moving at speeds equal to or greater than sound, it outruns those pressure waves.


    Ultrafast Camera Captures 'Sonic Booms' of Light for First TimeJust as aircraft flying at supersonic speeds create cone-shaped sonic booms, pulses of light can leave behind cone-shaped wakes of light. When an object moves through air, it propels the air in front of it away, creating pressure waves that move at the speed of sound in all directions. If the object is moving at speeds equal to or greater than sound, it outruns those pressure waves.


     
  • Later Gator! Video of Giant 'Humpback' Alligator Goes Viral      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 12:20:00 -0500

    Later Gator! Video of Giant 'Humpback' Alligator Goes ViralA viral video of a massive, and monstrous alligator known unofficially as "Humpback" has just been posted on the Facebook page of a natural reserve in Florida. The giant alligator was caught trekking slowly across a trail at the Circle B Bar Reserve near Lakeland, Florida. Though a face-to-face with "Humpback" would be terrifying, he is not an unusually large creature for his kind.


    Later Gator! Video of Giant 'Humpback' Alligator Goes ViralA viral video of a massive, and monstrous alligator known unofficially as "Humpback" has just been posted on the Facebook page of a natural reserve in Florida. The giant alligator was caught trekking slowly across a trail at the Circle B Bar Reserve near Lakeland, Florida. Though a face-to-face with "Humpback" would be terrifying, he is not an unusually large creature for his kind.


     
  • Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff Bezos      Thu, 26 Nov 2015 07:40:42 -0500

    Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff BezosEarly Monday (Nov. 23), the private spaceflight company Blue Origin made a major stride in the pursuit of fully reusable rockets, when it launched an uncrewed vehicle into space and then soft-landed the rocket booster on the ground. "It was one of the greatest moments of my life," said Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin's founder, speaking about the landing in a press briefing yesterday (Nov. 24). "And my teammates here at Blue Origin, I could see felt the same way.


    Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff BezosEarly Monday (Nov. 23), the private spaceflight company Blue Origin made a major stride in the pursuit of fully reusable rockets, when it launched an uncrewed vehicle into space and then soft-landed the rocket booster on the ground. "It was one of the greatest moments of my life," said Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin's founder, speaking about the landing in a press briefing yesterday (Nov. 24). "And my teammates here at Blue Origin, I could see felt the same way.


     
  • Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in Space      Thu, 26 Nov 2015 07:40:32 -0500

    Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in SpaceThanksgiving in space will be a lot like the holiday down here on the ground — minus the gravity, of course. Like most Americans, NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren have Thanksgiving (Nov. 26) off, and they'll spend the day aboard the International Space Station (ISS) watching football and enjoying a turkey-centric feast, agency officials said. Kelly and Lindgren gave viewers a look at that feast in a special Thanksgiving video this week, breaking out bags of smoked turkey, rehydratable corn, candied yams and potatoes au gratin.


    Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in SpaceThanksgiving in space will be a lot like the holiday down here on the ground — minus the gravity, of course. Like most Americans, NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren have Thanksgiving (Nov. 26) off, and they'll spend the day aboard the International Space Station (ISS) watching football and enjoying a turkey-centric feast, agency officials said. Kelly and Lindgren gave viewers a look at that feast in a special Thanksgiving video this week, breaking out bags of smoked turkey, rehydratable corn, candied yams and potatoes au gratin.


     
  • Ketchup Bottle Physics: Scientist Unlocks Key to Splat-Free Sauce      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 11:47:00 -0500

    Ketchup Bottle Physics: Scientist Unlocks Key to Splat-Free SauceAs such, the common method of tapping or whacking a ketchup bottle to encourage the sauce to come out is necessary, but what's the best way to keep the splatter at bay? The answer lies in understanding rheology, which is the study of these soft solids, said Anthony Stickland, a senior lecturer in the University of Melbourne's School of Engineering. There are three simple steps to getting ketchup out of the bottle without the mess, Stickland said in a statement.


    Ketchup Bottle Physics: Scientist Unlocks Key to Splat-Free SauceAs such, the common method of tapping or whacking a ketchup bottle to encourage the sauce to come out is necessary, but what's the best way to keep the splatter at bay? The answer lies in understanding rheology, which is the study of these soft solids, said Anthony Stickland, a senior lecturer in the University of Melbourne's School of Engineering. There are three simple steps to getting ketchup out of the bottle without the mess, Stickland said in a statement.


     
  • UK scientists give cancer risk warning on overdone chips, toast      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 10:23:51 -0500

    FILE PHOTO: French fries in HollywoodBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden colour rather than browned.


    FILE PHOTO: French fries in HollywoodBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden colour rather than browned.


     
  • UK scientists give cancer risk warning on overdone chips, toast      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 04:44:26 -0500
    By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden color rather than browned. 
  • UK scientists give cancer risk warning on overdone chips, toast      Mon, 23 Jan 2017 04:42:03 -0500

    Potato chips roll off conveyor belt before they are packed, at factory in village of PestovaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden colour rather than browned.


    Potato chips roll off conveyor belt before they are packed, at factory in village of PestovaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts, the FSA said that, to reduce the danger, consumers should cook these foods at lower temperatures and eat them when they are cooked to a golden colour rather than browned.


     
  • Scientists enter Hawaii dome in eight-month Mars space mission study      Fri, 20 Jan 2017 03:52:36 -0500
    Six scientists have entered a dome perched atop a remote volcano in Hawaii where they will spend the next eight months in isolation to simulate life for astronauts traveling to Mars, the University of Hawaii said. The study is designed to help NASA better understand human behavior and performance during long space missions as the U.S. space agency explores plans for a manned mission to the Red Planet. "I’m proud of the part we play in helping reduce the barriers to a human journey to Mars,” said Kim Binsted, the mission's principal investigator. 
  • Scientists enter Hawaii dome in eight-month Mars space mission study      Fri, 20 Jan 2017 03:47:06 -0500
    (Reuters) - Six scientists have entered a dome perched atop a remote volcano in Hawaii where they will spend the next eight months in isolation to simulate life for astronauts traveling to Mars, the University of Hawaii said. The study is designed to help NASA better understand human behavior and performance during long space missions as the U.S. space agency explores plans for a manned mission to the Red Planet. "I’m proud of the part we play in helping reduce the barriers to a human journey to Mars,” said Kim Binsted, the mission's principal investigator. 
  • Scientists will live in a dome for 8 months to simulate Mars      Thu, 19 Jan 2017 22:11:48 -0500

    In this May 23, 2014 photo provided by the University of Hawaii, Lucie Poulet, right, uses a geotechnical tool while Annie Caraccio records the data during a previous study outside the domed structure that will house six researchers for eight months in an environment meant to simulate an expedition to Mars, on Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii. The group will enter the dome Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, and spend eight months together in the 1,200-square-foot research facility in a study called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS). They will have no physical contact with any humans outside their group, experience a 20-minute delay in communications and are required to wear space suits whenever they leave the compound. (Ross Lockwood/University of Hawaii via AP)HONOLULU (AP) — Six carefully selected scientists have entered a man-made dome on a remote Hawaii volcano as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars.


    In this May 23, 2014 photo provided by the University of Hawaii, Lucie Poulet, right, uses a geotechnical tool while Annie Caraccio records the data during a previous study outside the domed structure that will house six researchers for eight months in an environment meant to simulate an expedition to Mars, on Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii. The group will enter the dome Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, and spend eight months together in the 1,200-square-foot research facility in a study called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS). They will have no physical contact with any humans outside their group, experience a 20-minute delay in communications and are required to wear space suits whenever they leave the compound. (Ross Lockwood/University of Hawaii via AP)HONOLULU (AP) — Six carefully selected scientists have entered a man-made dome on a remote Hawaii volcano as part of a human-behavior study that could help NASA as it draws up plans for sending astronauts on long missions to Mars.


     
  • California scientist names moth species after Donald Trump      Thu, 19 Jan 2017 13:27:37 -0500
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A scientist in California has named a newly discovered moth species after President-elect Donald Trump, saying the white and yellow scales on the insect's head are reminiscent of Trump's blond hairdo. 
  • Argentine scientists in Antarctica tally toll of climate change      Thu, 19 Jan 2017 09:01:18 -0500

    Cracks are seen on the Fourcade glacier near Argentina's Carlini Base in AntarcticaThe glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute.


    Cracks are seen on the Fourcade glacier near Argentina's Carlini Base in AntarcticaThe glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute.


     
  • Argentine scientists in Antarctica tally toll of climate change      Thu, 19 Jan 2017 08:06:08 -0500
    The glacier has retreated 500 meters (1,640 feet) over 25 years, scientists working on this island just north of the Antarctica Peninsula say, affecting an entire ecosystem of algae, sea lions and penguins, as well as raising sea levels. "This glacial retreat at Potter Cove releases a mass of fresh water that alters salinity levels and unleashes sediment ... changing the abundance and diversity of wildlife," said Rodolfo Sanchez, director of Argentina's Antarctic Institute. 
  • Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect days      Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:46:21 -0500

    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2013 file photo, a child plays with a ball next to a couple posing for a photographer in a park outside Bucharest, Romania. Newlywed couples took advantage of the unusual warm weather for the month of November, with temperatures reaching 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), for outdoor photo sessions. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2013 file photo, a child plays with a ball next to a couple posing for a photographer in a park outside Bucharest, Romania. Newlywed couples took advantage of the unusual warm weather for the month of November, with temperatures reaching 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit), for outdoor photo sessions. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


     
  • Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio Images      Wed, 18 Jan 2017 08:00:00 -0500

    Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio ImagesThe sprawling ground-based telescope is more usually used to probe radio waves released by some of the universe's most distant galaxies. In this case, though, it picked up waves released by the sun's chromosphere, which is the area just above the surface you see in visible light. Images returned by detecting radio waves at 2.5 and 3 millimeters show conditions at two different chromosphere depths — and the new views could lend more insight into the sun's physics.


    Turtle the Size of 2 Earths: Stunning Sunspot Revealed in New Radio ImagesThe sprawling ground-based telescope is more usually used to probe radio waves released by some of the universe's most distant galaxies. In this case, though, it picked up waves released by the sun's chromosphere, which is the area just above the surface you see in visible light. Images returned by detecting radio waves at 2.5 and 3 millimeters show conditions at two different chromosphere depths — and the new views could lend more insight into the sun's physics.


     
  • Global warming could steal postcard-perfect weather days      Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:30:00 -0500

    Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect daysWASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


    Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect daysWASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather.


     
  • Antarctic ice floe crack forces UK scientists to leave      Tue, 17 Jan 2017 10:41:26 -0500

    Halley VI Research Station modules at the old site_The decision was taken after a huge crack appeared in the Brunt Ice Shelf, just 10 miles away from the Halley VI research station. "We want to do the right thing for our people,” said Captain Tim Stocking, Director of Operations at the British Antarctic Society (BAS). "Bringing them home for winter is a prudent precaution given the changes that our glaciologists have seen in the ice shelf in recent months." There are currently 88 scientists stationed at the Halley VI research centre, which monitors climate data and played a key role in discovering the ozone hole in 1986.


    Halley VI Research Station modules at the old site_The decision was taken after a huge crack appeared in the Brunt Ice Shelf, just 10 miles away from the Halley VI research station. "We want to do the right thing for our people,” said Captain Tim Stocking, Director of Operations at the British Antarctic Society (BAS). "Bringing them home for winter is a prudent precaution given the changes that our glaciologists have seen in the ice shelf in recent months." There are currently 88 scientists stationed at the Halley VI research centre, which monitors climate data and played a key role in discovering the ozone hole in 1986.


     
  • "Pragmatic" Trump might be persuaded on climate action - UK scientists      Mon, 16 Jan 2017 13:37:06 -0500

    FILE PHOTO: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York CityBy Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London.


    FILE PHOTO: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York CityBy Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London.


     
  • 'Pragmatic' Trump might be persuaded on climate action: UK scientists      Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:57:52 -0500
    By Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London. 
  • 'Pragmatic' Trump might be persuaded on climate action - UK scientists      Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:30:32 -0500
    By Laurie Goering LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Donald Trump's administration, heavy with fossil fuel industry backers, could cause major damage to efforts to deal with climate change through measures such as cutting access to satellite data for weather forecasting and climate research, scientists warned Monday. It also appears increasingly unlikely he will pull the United States out of major international bodies dealing with climate change, though he may cut funding for them, the scientists said. For instance, the United States could renege on delivering much of the $3 billion it promised to the Green Climate Fund to help poorer nations develop cleanly and cope with climate impacts, said Joanna Haigh, an atmospheric physicist and co-director of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial College London. 
  • UK climate scientists raise concerns about Trump presidency      Sun, 15 Jan 2017 22:47:12 -0500

    U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York CityBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


    U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York CityBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


     
  • UK climate scientists raise concerns about Trump presidency      Sun, 15 Jan 2017 19:08:25 -0500

    U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at a "Thank You USA" tour rally in Grand RapidsBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


    U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at a "Thank You USA" tour rally in Grand RapidsBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


     
  • UK climate scientists raise concerns about Trump presidency      Sun, 15 Jan 2017 19:07:51 -0500

    A view under the Altesch Glacier where ice melts inside a glacier cave in FieschBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


    A view under the Altesch Glacier where ice melts inside a glacier cave in FieschBritish climate scientists asked Britain's prime minister on Monday to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge climate change risks and support international action to slow global warming. Prime Minister Theresa May will meet Trump in Washington in the spring, in the first visit with the new president by the leader of one of the United States' closest allies. In a letter to May, the 100 scientists said there were "potential threats" to the British national interest from Trump's election in November.


     
  • 12 Years Later, Scientists Remember Epic Landing on Saturn Moon Titan      Sat, 14 Jan 2017 14:00:00 -0500

    12 Years Later, Scientists Remember Epic Landing on Saturn Moon TitanAs NASA's Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft begins its final eight months of operation, scientists are looking back at one of the mission's most dramatic moments: the landing of the piggyback Huygens probe on the huge moon Titan. Huygens touched down on Titan's frigid surface on Jan. 14, 2005, three weeks after separating from the Cassini mothership. "The Huygens descent and landing represented a major breakthrough in our exploration of Titan as well as the first soft landing on an outer-planet moon," Cassini project scientist Linda Spilker, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.


    12 Years Later, Scientists Remember Epic Landing on Saturn Moon TitanAs NASA's Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft begins its final eight months of operation, scientists are looking back at one of the mission's most dramatic moments: the landing of the piggyback Huygens probe on the huge moon Titan. Huygens touched down on Titan's frigid surface on Jan. 14, 2005, three weeks after separating from the Cassini mothership. "The Huygens descent and landing represented a major breakthrough in our exploration of Titan as well as the first soft landing on an outer-planet moon," Cassini project scientist Linda Spilker, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.


     
  • The Science of Beauty: What's Really Driving the Fuller Lip Trend?      Sat, 14 Jan 2017 13:34:00 -0500

    The Science of Beauty: What's Really Driving the Fuller Lip Trend?A quick scroll through Instagram may leave you with the impression that full lips are in style at this very moment, but a new scientific analysis of fashion models says that the trend is surprisingly absent. One explanation for the results may be that the fashion industry is no longer driving beauty trends — instead, it’s possible that celebrities may be the new driving factor instead, according to the study. However, the fashion industry has often played a role in what women seek from cosmetic procedures, the authors wrote in the study.


    The Science of Beauty: What's Really Driving the Fuller Lip Trend?A quick scroll through Instagram may leave you with the impression that full lips are in style at this very moment, but a new scientific analysis of fashion models says that the trend is surprisingly absent. One explanation for the results may be that the fashion industry is no longer driving beauty trends — instead, it’s possible that celebrities may be the new driving factor instead, according to the study. However, the fashion industry has often played a role in what women seek from cosmetic procedures, the authors wrote in the study.


     
  • Stem Cells Could Restore Vision After Eye Disease      Fri, 13 Jan 2017 09:51:00 -0500

    Stem Cells Could Restore Vision After Eye DiseaseResearchers used stem cells to grow new retina tissue in a lab, and then transplanted that tissue into mice that had end-stage retinal degeneration. More than 40 percent of the mice gained the ability to see light as the result of the procedure, the researchers said. "We were at first very excited to see that the transplants do robustly respond to light," Dr. Michiko Mandai, the first author of the paper and a deputy project leader at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan, told Live Science.


    Stem Cells Could Restore Vision After Eye DiseaseResearchers used stem cells to grow new retina tissue in a lab, and then transplanted that tissue into mice that had end-stage retinal degeneration. More than 40 percent of the mice gained the ability to see light as the result of the procedure, the researchers said. "We were at first very excited to see that the transplants do robustly respond to light," Dr. Michiko Mandai, the first author of the paper and a deputy project leader at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan, told Live Science.


     
  • Green Glow from Ancient Galaxies Surprises Scientists      Fri, 13 Jan 2017 07:00:00 -0500

    Green Glow from Ancient Galaxies Surprises ScientistsThe galaxies are greener on the other side of the universe, it seems: A new analysis reveals that some of the most distant galaxies ever observed are radiating green light, a finding that could deeply affect developing models of those early galaxies. Researchers have seen this same kind of green light coming from a few galaxies in the nearby universe, but, according to Malkin, the "shocking" part of the new analysis is in the number of galaxies involved: The green light that researchers observed in the new study appears to be coming from most or all of the galaxies that formed in the first 1 billion or 2 billion years of the universe.


    Green Glow from Ancient Galaxies Surprises ScientistsThe galaxies are greener on the other side of the universe, it seems: A new analysis reveals that some of the most distant galaxies ever observed are radiating green light, a finding that could deeply affect developing models of those early galaxies. Researchers have seen this same kind of green light coming from a few galaxies in the nearby universe, but, according to Malkin, the "shocking" part of the new analysis is in the number of galaxies involved: The green light that researchers observed in the new study appears to be coming from most or all of the galaxies that formed in the first 1 billion or 2 billion years of the universe.


     
  • BRIEF-Uni-Bio Science Group Ltd says Tong Kit Shing has ceased to be executive director, chairman      Fri, 13 Jan 2017 06:42:21 -0500
    Jan 13 (Reuters) - Uni-Bio Science Group Ltd * Tong Kit Shing has retired and ceased to be an executivedirector, chairman of board * Kingsley Leung has been appointed as chairman of board * Chen Dawei has been appointed as an executive director,vice-chairman of boardSource text for Eikon: Further company coverage: 
  • Your Drunken Urge for Pizza and Wings, Explained by Science      Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:01:00 -0500

    Your Drunken Urge for Pizza and Wings, Explained by ScienceNow, a new study in mice may offer a possible explanation for this desire to overeat: Alcohol may activate some of the brain cells that normally make people feel hungry. Although the study was conducted in mice, the findings likely apply to people as well because humans have the same types of neurons in their brains as the neurons the researchers focused on in the study, said Jessica R. Barson, an assistant professor of neurobiology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, who was not involved in the study. Previous research has shown that people tend to overeat after drinking alcohol — a phenomenon dubbed "the apéritif effect" — but it was not clear what the potential biological reasons for this link might be.


    Your Drunken Urge for Pizza and Wings, Explained by ScienceNow, a new study in mice may offer a possible explanation for this desire to overeat: Alcohol may activate some of the brain cells that normally make people feel hungry. Although the study was conducted in mice, the findings likely apply to people as well because humans have the same types of neurons in their brains as the neurons the researchers focused on in the study, said Jessica R. Barson, an assistant professor of neurobiology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, who was not involved in the study. Previous research has shown that people tend to overeat after drinking alcohol — a phenomenon dubbed "the apéritif effect" — but it was not clear what the potential biological reasons for this link might be.


     
  • Scientists hear voice of ancient humans in baboon calls      Thu, 12 Jan 2017 07:24:21 -0500

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2015 file photo, Sahara, a rare red-haired female Hamadryas Baboon holds 3 weeks old dark-furred baby in the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv, Israel. A new study in France shows that baboons can make human-like vowel sounds, and its authors say the discovery could help scientists better understand the evolution of human speech. The study was published in the journal Plos One on Wednesday Jan. 11, 2017 by a team of scientists. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)PARIS (AP) — Baboon grunts and mating calls may hold secrets about human speech, according to a new study suggesting that the origins of human language could reach back as much as 25 million years.


    FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2015 file photo, Sahara, a rare red-haired female Hamadryas Baboon holds 3 weeks old dark-furred baby in the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv, Israel. A new study in France shows that baboons can make human-like vowel sounds, and its authors say the discovery could help scientists better understand the evolution of human speech. The study was published in the journal Plos One on Wednesday Jan. 11, 2017 by a team of scientists. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, File)PARIS (AP) — Baboon grunts and mating calls may hold secrets about human speech, according to a new study suggesting that the origins of human language could reach back as much as 25 million years.


     
  • 1 Japanese, 2 Americans win Crafoord science prize      Thu, 12 Jan 2017 04:34:42 -0500
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A Japanese and two American scientists have been awarded the 2017 Crafoord Prize for fundamental discoveries in immune regulation. 


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