Home | SOAP Tools | UDDI Browser | ResourcesSource Code | RFCs | News Reader  | SOAP Interop | Bookmarks 

  

General
Reuters
CNN
Wired News
News.com
CBS News
NY Time
BBC
BBC World
Google News
Yahoo News
ABC News
Political Wire
WashingtonPost
WorldPress
US News
CS Monitor
Business
NY Time
CNN
Reuter
ABC News
CBS News
BBC Business
Forbes
Technology
CNET
CNN
Reuter
NY Time
WashingtonPost
Wired News
BBC
InfoWorld
InfoWorld WS
WebReference
LinuxToday
XML.com
XML Cover Pages
OASIS
W3C
Internet.com
JavaScript Tip
Linux Today
WDVL
CodeProject
SOAPAgent.com
Articles
Web Services
SOAP Resources
New Additions
Software Download
Most Popular
New Releases
Hot Title
Software Developer
Yahoo News
Top Stories
World
Business
Technology
Politics
Science
Sports
New York Times
Home Page
World
Business
Technology
Politics
Science
Sports
Reuters
Top News
World
Business
Technology
World News
CNN
CBS
WashingtonPost
RSS News Feeds
ChannelYahoo News - Latest News & Headlines    
RSS File: http://news.yahoo.com/rss/science
Description: The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.
  • World's 2nd-largest Ebola outbreak exceeds 1,000 cases      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 06:11:00 -0400

    World's 2nd-largest Ebola outbreak exceeds 1,000 casesThe second-largest, second-deadliest Ebola outbreak in history has exceeded 1,000 cases in less than nine months. A total of 1,009 people have reported symptoms of hemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's northeastern provinces of North Kivu and Ituri since ‪Aug. 1.‬ Among those cases, 944 have tested positive for Ebola, which causes an often-fatal type of hemorrhagic fever, according to Sunday night's bulletin from the country's health ministry. There have been 629 deaths so far, including 564 people who died from confirmed cases of Ebola.


    World's 2nd-largest Ebola outbreak exceeds 1,000 casesThe second-largest, second-deadliest Ebola outbreak in history has exceeded 1,000 cases in less than nine months. A total of 1,009 people have reported symptoms of hemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's northeastern provinces of North Kivu and Ituri since ‪Aug. 1.‬ Among those cases, 944 have tested positive for Ebola, which causes an often-fatal type of hemorrhagic fever, according to Sunday night's bulletin from the country's health ministry. There have been 629 deaths so far, including 564 people who died from confirmed cases of Ebola.


     

  • Bill Gates urges Afghanistan and Pakistan to 'get to zero' in polio fight      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 05:52:00 -0400

    Bill Gates urges Afghanistan and Pakistan to 'get to zero' in polio fightIn a telephone interview with Reuters, Gates was optimistic about the global plan to eradicate the paralyzing viral disease, but said Afghanistan's conflict and power struggles hamper progress. "The big issue there is always with the Taliban," said Gates, whose multi-billion dollar philanthropic Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is one of the biggest funders of the polio eradication campaign. Polio is a virus that spreads in areas with poor sanitation.


    Bill Gates urges Afghanistan and Pakistan to 'get to zero' in polio fightIn a telephone interview with Reuters, Gates was optimistic about the global plan to eradicate the paralyzing viral disease, but said Afghanistan's conflict and power struggles hamper progress. "The big issue there is always with the Taliban," said Gates, whose multi-billion dollar philanthropic Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is one of the biggest funders of the polio eradication campaign. Polio is a virus that spreads in areas with poor sanitation.


     

  • Naspers to Separate Tencent Stake, Web Assets in Dutch Listing      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 05:50:20 -0400

    Naspers to Separate Tencent Stake, Web Assets in Dutch ListingNaspers chose Euronext Amsterdam to list a business that includes its 31 percent holding in Tencent, as well as investments in Russian internet platform Mail.Ru, German food delivery business Delivery Hero and Indian e-commerce startup Swiggy. The listing, meant to attract international investors, is part of Chief Executive Officer Bob Van Dijk’s effort to reduce the gap between the Cape Town-based company’s market value of about 1.41 trillion rand ($97.9 billion) and its Tencent stake. Naspers has been considering listings other than its primary one in Johannesburg, which some investors have encouraged.


    Naspers to Separate Tencent Stake, Web Assets in Dutch ListingNaspers chose Euronext Amsterdam to list a business that includes its 31 percent holding in Tencent, as well as investments in Russian internet platform Mail.Ru, German food delivery business Delivery Hero and Indian e-commerce startup Swiggy. The listing, meant to attract international investors, is part of Chief Executive Officer Bob Van Dijk’s effort to reduce the gap between the Cape Town-based company’s market value of about 1.41 trillion rand ($97.9 billion) and its Tencent stake. Naspers has been considering listings other than its primary one in Johannesburg, which some investors have encouraged.


     

  • SoftBank’s Founder Missed Out on Amazon Stake — Over $30 Million      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 04:36:35 -0400

    SoftBank’s Founder Missed Out on Amazon Stake — Over $30 MillionSon, speaking at the Milken Institute conference in Tokyo, said he was close to striking a deal to acquire 30 percent of the U.S. e-commerce pioneer with Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos in its early years. Son offered $100 million, but Bezos insisted on $130 million. "We were laughing about it when I met him again recently,” Son said.


    SoftBank’s Founder Missed Out on Amazon Stake — Over $30 MillionSon, speaking at the Milken Institute conference in Tokyo, said he was close to striking a deal to acquire 30 percent of the U.S. e-commerce pioneer with Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos in its early years. Son offered $100 million, but Bezos insisted on $130 million. "We were laughing about it when I met him again recently,” Son said.


     

  • EU approves AstraZeneca's drug for adjunct use in Type-1 diabetes      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 04:35:58 -0400

    EU approves AstraZeneca's drug for adjunct use in Type-1 diabetesBritish drugmaker AstraZeneca Plc said on Monday the European Commission approved its diabetes drug Forxiga for use as an oral supplement to insulin in adults with a rare type of the disease. Forxiga can now be used along with insulin in patients with Type-1 diabetes and a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 27 or more when insulin alone has not been able to control blood sugar levels, the company said. Type-1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin hormone.


    EU approves AstraZeneca's drug for adjunct use in Type-1 diabetesBritish drugmaker AstraZeneca Plc said on Monday the European Commission approved its diabetes drug Forxiga for use as an oral supplement to insulin in adults with a rare type of the disease. Forxiga can now be used along with insulin in patients with Type-1 diabetes and a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 27 or more when insulin alone has not been able to control blood sugar levels, the company said. Type-1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin hormone.


     

  • Uber to Seal $3.1 Billion Deal to Buy Careem This Week      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 04:07:46 -0400

    Uber to Seal $3.1 Billion Deal to Buy Careem This WeekThe U.S. ride-hailing giant will pay $1.4 billion in cash and $1.7 billion in convertible notes for Careem, the people said, asking not to identified because the talks are private. The notes will be convertible into Uber shares at a price equal to $55 per share, according to the term-sheet seen by Bloomberg. Shareholders in Careem, whose backers include Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal’s investment firm and Japanese e-commerce company Rakuten Inc., have been asked to agree to the terms of the transaction by Monday evening and a deal could be announced as soon as Tuesday, the people said.


    Uber to Seal $3.1 Billion Deal to Buy Careem This WeekThe U.S. ride-hailing giant will pay $1.4 billion in cash and $1.7 billion in convertible notes for Careem, the people said, asking not to identified because the talks are private. The notes will be convertible into Uber shares at a price equal to $55 per share, according to the term-sheet seen by Bloomberg. Shareholders in Careem, whose backers include Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal’s investment firm and Japanese e-commerce company Rakuten Inc., have been asked to agree to the terms of the transaction by Monday evening and a deal could be announced as soon as Tuesday, the people said.


     

  • Oil prices slip amid worries of severe economic slowdown      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 04:01:18 -0400

    Oil prices slip amid worries of severe economic slowdownSINGAPORE (Reuters) - Oil prices slipped on Monday, with concerns of a sharp economic slowdown outweighing supply disruptions from OPEC's production cutbacks and from U.S. sanctions on Iran and Venezuela.


    Oil prices slip amid worries of severe economic slowdownSINGAPORE (Reuters) - Oil prices slipped on Monday, with concerns of a sharp economic slowdown outweighing supply disruptions from OPEC's production cutbacks and from U.S. sanctions on Iran and Venezuela.


     

  • U.S. buyers of Venezuelan oil sub in Shell, BP offshore crude      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 02:26:07 -0400

    U.S. buyers of Venezuelan oil sub in Shell, BP offshore crudeU.S. sanctions on Venezuela's oil industry have made winners out of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc, Gulf of Mexico offshore heavyweights, as refiners in need of substitutes are scooping up oil produced in the region. Trading volumes in these grades of oil have surged to the highest in months, and prices touched five-year peaks after sanctions were imposed.


    U.S. buyers of Venezuelan oil sub in Shell, BP offshore crudeU.S. sanctions on Venezuela's oil industry have made winners out of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc, Gulf of Mexico offshore heavyweights, as refiners in need of substitutes are scooping up oil produced in the region. Trading volumes in these grades of oil have surged to the highest in months, and prices touched five-year peaks after sanctions were imposed.


     

  • Exclusive: Aztec war sacrifices found in Mexico may point to elusive royal tomb      Mon, 25 Mar 2019 02:18:22 -0400

    Exclusive: Aztec war sacrifices found in Mexico may point to elusive royal tombA trove of Aztec sacrifices including a richly adorned jaguar dressed as a warrior and recently discovered in downtown Mexico City could lead archaeologists to the most tantalizing find yet: an Aztec emperor's tomb. Discovered off the steps of the Aztec's holiest temple during the reign of the empire's most powerful ruler, the sacrificial offerings also include a young boy, dressed to resemble the Aztec war god and solar deity, and a set of flint knives elaborately decorated with mother of pearl and precious stones. The offerings were deposited by Aztec priests over five centuries ago in a circular, ritual platform once located in front of the temple where the earliest historical accounts describe the final resting place of Aztec kings.


    Exclusive: Aztec war sacrifices found in Mexico may point to elusive royal tombA trove of Aztec sacrifices including a richly adorned jaguar dressed as a warrior and recently discovered in downtown Mexico City could lead archaeologists to the most tantalizing find yet: an Aztec emperor's tomb. Discovered off the steps of the Aztec's holiest temple during the reign of the empire's most powerful ruler, the sacrificial offerings also include a young boy, dressed to resemble the Aztec war god and solar deity, and a set of flint knives elaborately decorated with mother of pearl and precious stones. The offerings were deposited by Aztec priests over five centuries ago in a circular, ritual platform once located in front of the temple where the earliest historical accounts describe the final resting place of Aztec kings.


     

  • Microsoft's Smith Urges Talk of Tech's 'Legal Responsibilities'      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 19:33:19 -0400

    Microsoft's Smith Urges Talk of Tech's 'Legal Responsibilities'"There are legal responsibilities that need to be discussed," Smith, who’s also the software maker’s chief legal officer, wrote in a Sunday blog post that said a company team had begun a pre-planned trip to the country the day before. After video of the killings went viral on social media, some policy-makers urged that these sites take greater responsibility for stemming the spread of violent content. It was not immediately clear how Smith would change policy, although he appeared open to solutions that went beyond industry best practices and self-regulation.


    Microsoft's Smith Urges Talk of Tech's 'Legal Responsibilities'"There are legal responsibilities that need to be discussed," Smith, who’s also the software maker’s chief legal officer, wrote in a Sunday blog post that said a company team had begun a pre-planned trip to the country the day before. After video of the killings went viral on social media, some policy-makers urged that these sites take greater responsibility for stemming the spread of violent content. It was not immediately clear how Smith would change policy, although he appeared open to solutions that went beyond industry best practices and self-regulation.


     

  • Sad Stealth: Was the Lockheed Martin F-117 Nighthawk Retired Too Soon?      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 19:00:00 -0400

    Sad Stealth: Was the Lockheed Martin F-117 Nighthawk Retired Too Soon?Or was it too old to be a threat?


    Sad Stealth: Was the Lockheed Martin F-117 Nighthawk Retired Too Soon?Or was it too old to be a threat?


     

  • India Bans on Most Popular Game Show Fear of Creating ‘Psychopaths’      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 18:00:00 -0400

    India Bans on Most Popular Game Show Fear of Creating ‘Psychopaths’After China’s Tencent Holdings Ltd. introduced a mobile version of the death match that’s free to play, it has become the most popular smartphone game in the world, with enthusiasts from the U.S. to Russia to Malaysia. Nowhere has resistance to the game been quite like India. Multiple cities have banned PUBG, as it’s known, and police in Western India arrested 10 university students for playing.


    India Bans on Most Popular Game Show Fear of Creating ‘Psychopaths’After China’s Tencent Holdings Ltd. introduced a mobile version of the death match that’s free to play, it has become the most popular smartphone game in the world, with enthusiasts from the U.S. to Russia to Malaysia. Nowhere has resistance to the game been quite like India. Multiple cities have banned PUBG, as it’s known, and police in Western India arrested 10 university students for playing.


     

  • YouTube Bows Out of Hollywood Arms Race With Netflix and Amazon      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 18:00:00 -0400

    YouTube Bows Out of Hollywood Arms Race With Netflix and AmazonThe retreat from direct competition with Netflix Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime Video service reflects the high cost -- in billions of dollars -- needed to take on those deeply entrenched players, even for a rich tech giant like Google, the people said. YouTube generated more than $15 billion in ad sales last year without a huge slate of glitzy productions and concluded its money is better invested in music and gaming. The strategy change, first reported last November by the Hollywood Reporter, means all YouTube shows will eventually air for free.


    YouTube Bows Out of Hollywood Arms Race With Netflix and AmazonThe retreat from direct competition with Netflix Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime Video service reflects the high cost -- in billions of dollars -- needed to take on those deeply entrenched players, even for a rich tech giant like Google, the people said. YouTube generated more than $15 billion in ad sales last year without a huge slate of glitzy productions and concluded its money is better invested in music and gaming. The strategy change, first reported last November by the Hollywood Reporter, means all YouTube shows will eventually air for free.


     

  • Why Russia's Aircraft Carrier Dreams Won't Die      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 15:00:00 -0400

    Why Russia's Aircraft Carrier Dreams Won't DieWould Moscow ever still consider building a ship like this?


    Why Russia's Aircraft Carrier Dreams Won't DieWould Moscow ever still consider building a ship like this?


     

  • This incredible NASA snapshot reminds us how gorgeous Jupiter really is      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 14:59:44 -0400

    This incredible NASA snapshot reminds us how gorgeous Jupiter really isJupiter, the "king" of planets in our solar system, is a hostile place you definitely wouldn't want to visit. The gas giant is a swirling mass of storms that stretch hundreds of miles deep, and the larger storms on the planet like the Great Red Spot are large enough to swallow Earth several times over.Despite its volatile nature, and the fact that nobody really knows what lies deep within the planet, Jupiter is still one of NASA's favorite photography targets because it's just so beautiful. Now, NASA is showing off a new, enhanced image snapped by the Juno spacecraft, and it's pure eye candy.The image might look like a single photo but, as NASA explains in a new blog post, it's actually the result of three separate snapshots captured by Juno:> Juno took the three images used to produce this color-enhanced view on Feb. 12, 2019, between 9:59 a.m. PST (12:59 p.m. EST) and 10:39 a.m. PST (1:39 p.m. EST), as the spacecraft performed its 17th science pass of Jupiter. At the time the images were taken, the spacecraft was between 16,700 miles (26,900 kilometers) and 59,300 miles (95,400 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops, above a southern latitude spanning from about 40 to 74 degrees.NASA uploads all of Juno's "JunoCam" images to a web portal where citizen scientists can apply enhancements that bring out additional detail. In this case, a citizen scientist named Kevin M. Gill spent some time sprucing things up and the end result is the lovely view you see above (full resolution here).Juno has proven invaluable to NASA during its over seven years orbiting Jupiter. The spacecraft has taught scientists about the planet's intense currents and storms, and revealed that some of the planet's most iconic features, like the Great Red Spot, are gradually dying.Juno's original mission timeline lasted seven years, but because the spacecraft was still performing well, NASA has since extended it until mid-2021.


    This incredible NASA snapshot reminds us how gorgeous Jupiter really isJupiter, the "king" of planets in our solar system, is a hostile place you definitely wouldn't want to visit. The gas giant is a swirling mass of storms that stretch hundreds of miles deep, and the larger storms on the planet like the Great Red Spot are large enough to swallow Earth several times over.Despite its volatile nature, and the fact that nobody really knows what lies deep within the planet, Jupiter is still one of NASA's favorite photography targets because it's just so beautiful. Now, NASA is showing off a new, enhanced image snapped by the Juno spacecraft, and it's pure eye candy.The image might look like a single photo but, as NASA explains in a new blog post, it's actually the result of three separate snapshots captured by Juno:> Juno took the three images used to produce this color-enhanced view on Feb. 12, 2019, between 9:59 a.m. PST (12:59 p.m. EST) and 10:39 a.m. PST (1:39 p.m. EST), as the spacecraft performed its 17th science pass of Jupiter. At the time the images were taken, the spacecraft was between 16,700 miles (26,900 kilometers) and 59,300 miles (95,400 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops, above a southern latitude spanning from about 40 to 74 degrees.NASA uploads all of Juno's "JunoCam" images to a web portal where citizen scientists can apply enhancements that bring out additional detail. In this case, a citizen scientist named Kevin M. Gill spent some time sprucing things up and the end result is the lovely view you see above (full resolution here).Juno has proven invaluable to NASA during its over seven years orbiting Jupiter. The spacecraft has taught scientists about the planet's intense currents and storms, and revealed that some of the planet's most iconic features, like the Great Red Spot, are gradually dying.Juno's original mission timeline lasted seven years, but because the spacecraft was still performing well, NASA has since extended it until mid-2021.


     

  • How I Deal With Periods of 'Diabetes Burnout'      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 14:30:32 -0400

    How I Deal With Periods of 'Diabetes Burnout'A woman with type 1 diabetes explains how she deals with periods of "diabetes burnout" where she doesn't feel motivated to manage her condition.


    How I Deal With Periods of 'Diabetes Burnout'A woman with type 1 diabetes explains how she deals with periods of "diabetes burnout" where she doesn't feel motivated to manage her condition.


     

  • Petrochemical leak keeps stretch of Houston port closed a third day      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 13:43:27 -0400

    Petrochemical leak keeps stretch of Houston port closed a third dayShip traffic was halted for a third day on Sunday along a key stretch of the United State's busiest oil port as emergency workers siphoned fuels from the Houston Ship Channel that leaked from a massive fire at a nearby petrochemical storage facility. Before the wall was repaired on Saturday, the breach sent fuels, water and fire suppressant foam to a waterway that connects Houston to the Gulf of Mexico. The spill and cleanup has halted ship traffic since Friday on a 5-mile stretch of the channel serving petrochemical import and export terminals.


    Petrochemical leak keeps stretch of Houston port closed a third dayShip traffic was halted for a third day on Sunday along a key stretch of the United State's busiest oil port as emergency workers siphoned fuels from the Houston Ship Channel that leaked from a massive fire at a nearby petrochemical storage facility. Before the wall was repaired on Saturday, the breach sent fuels, water and fire suppressant foam to a waterway that connects Houston to the Gulf of Mexico. The spill and cleanup has halted ship traffic since Friday on a 5-mile stretch of the channel serving petrochemical import and export terminals.


     

  • With an eye on Iran, U.S. clinches strategic port deal with Oman      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 10:13:52 -0400

    With an eye on Iran, U.S. clinches strategic port deal with OmanThe U.S. embassy in Oman said in a statement that the agreement governed U.S. access to facilities and ports in Duqm as well as in Salalah and "reaffirms the commitment of both countries to promoting mutual security goals." The accord is viewed through an economic prism by Oman, which wants to develop Duqm while preserving its Switzerland-like neutral role in Middle Eastern politics and diplomacy. A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the deal was significant by improving access to ports that connect to a network of roads to the broader region, giving the U.S. military great resiliency in a crisis. "We used to operate on the assumption that we could just steam into the Gulf," one U.S. official said, adding, however, that "the quality and quantity of Iranian weapons raises concerns." Tehran has in the past threatened to block the Strait of Hormuz, a major oil shipping route at the mouth of the Gulf, in retaliation for any hostile U.S. action, including attempts to halt Iranian oil exports through sanctions.


    With an eye on Iran, U.S. clinches strategic port deal with OmanThe U.S. embassy in Oman said in a statement that the agreement governed U.S. access to facilities and ports in Duqm as well as in Salalah and "reaffirms the commitment of both countries to promoting mutual security goals." The accord is viewed through an economic prism by Oman, which wants to develop Duqm while preserving its Switzerland-like neutral role in Middle Eastern politics and diplomacy. A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the deal was significant by improving access to ports that connect to a network of roads to the broader region, giving the U.S. military great resiliency in a crisis. "We used to operate on the assumption that we could just steam into the Gulf," one U.S. official said, adding, however, that "the quality and quantity of Iranian weapons raises concerns." Tehran has in the past threatened to block the Strait of Hormuz, a major oil shipping route at the mouth of the Gulf, in retaliation for any hostile U.S. action, including attempts to halt Iranian oil exports through sanctions.


     

  • Emilia Clarke Reveals She Suffered 2 Brain Aneurysms While Filming Game Of Thrones: “I Wasn’t Going to Live”      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 09:33:00 -0400

    Emilia Clarke Reveals She Suffered 2 Brain Aneurysms While Filming Game Of Thrones: “I Wasn’t Going to Live”The ‘Game of Thrones’ actress experienced her first one at age 24 while doing a plank.


    Emilia Clarke Reveals She Suffered 2 Brain Aneurysms While Filming Game Of Thrones: “I Wasn’t Going to Live”The ‘Game of Thrones’ actress experienced her first one at age 24 while doing a plank.


     

  • Keep Your Torpedoes Crossed: Breakthrough Could Turn U.S. Submarines into 'Aircraft Carriers'      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 09:00:00 -0400

    Keep Your Torpedoes Crossed: Breakthrough Could Turn U.S. Submarines into 'Aircraft Carriers'Lots of questions, but it all seems very exciting—and likely to keep planners in Beijing and Moscow scratching their heads.


    Keep Your Torpedoes Crossed: Breakthrough Could Turn U.S. Submarines into 'Aircraft Carriers'Lots of questions, but it all seems very exciting—and likely to keep planners in Beijing and Moscow scratching their heads.


     

  • FDA takes up decades-long debate over breast implant safety      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 08:28:41 -0400

    FDA takes up decades-long debate over breast implant safetyWASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate.


    FDA takes up decades-long debate over breast implant safetyWASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials are taking another look at the safety of breast implants, the latest review in a decades-long debate.


     

  • Alibaba Buys Israeli AR Startup Amid China Investment Scrutiny      Sun, 24 Mar 2019 07:31:40 -0400

    Alibaba Buys Israeli AR Startup Amid China Investment ScrutinyInfinityAR will join Alibaba’s Israel Machine Vision Laboratory, according to a release dated Thursday on the startup’s website. Financial details were not disclosed, but Alibaba paid more than $10 million, according to an estimate from market sources cited by Globes. “The talented team brings unique know-how in sensor fusion, computer vision and navigation technologies,” lab head Lihi Zelnik-Manor said in the release.


    Alibaba Buys Israeli AR Startup Amid China Investment ScrutinyInfinityAR will join Alibaba’s Israel Machine Vision Laboratory, according to a release dated Thursday on the startup’s website. Financial details were not disclosed, but Alibaba paid more than $10 million, according to an estimate from market sources cited by Globes. “The talented team brings unique know-how in sensor fusion, computer vision and navigation technologies,” lab head Lihi Zelnik-Manor said in the release.


     

  • 'It scared the hell out of people': Looking back at Three Mile Island 40 years ago      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 22:03:59 -0400

    'It scared the hell out of people': Looking back at Three Mile Island 40 years agoThe March 28, 1979, accident at the nuclear power plant led to widespread fear in the region. Today, though, the plant just seems to be part of the landscape.


    'It scared the hell out of people': Looking back at Three Mile Island 40 years agoThe March 28, 1979, accident at the nuclear power plant led to widespread fear in the region. Today, though, the plant just seems to be part of the landscape.


     

  • The Complex Fortune Growing Inside World's Most Valuable Startup      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 20:00:00 -0400

    The Complex Fortune Growing Inside World's Most Valuable StartupThe 35-year-old founder of Bytedance Ltd. is worth about $13 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, making him China’s 9th-richest person and one of the fastest in modern times to amass a mega-fortune. Zhang’s fortune is harder to calculate than the founders of Baidu Inc. and Tencent Holdings Ltd. in part because his company isn’t yet public. It’s also difficult because Bytedance is structured in the same way as the two tech behemoths -- a complicated ownership system known as a variable interest entity.


    The Complex Fortune Growing Inside World's Most Valuable StartupThe 35-year-old founder of Bytedance Ltd. is worth about $13 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, making him China’s 9th-richest person and one of the fastest in modern times to amass a mega-fortune. Zhang’s fortune is harder to calculate than the founders of Baidu Inc. and Tencent Holdings Ltd. in part because his company isn’t yet public. It’s also difficult because Bytedance is structured in the same way as the two tech behemoths -- a complicated ownership system known as a variable interest entity.


     

  • Some remains of Guatemala volcano victims unidentified: official      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 19:28:32 -0400

    Some remains of Guatemala volcano victims unidentified: officialGuatemalan investigators have been unable to identify about 110 pieces of remains from victims of a volcanic eruption that killed 202 people and left 229 missing last June, a forensic official said Saturday. After months of testing, which included sending some samples abroad, about 110 remains cannot be identified, said the head of the National Forensic Sciences Office, Fanuel Garcia. "We have all of them and we are holding on to them, awaiting a time to carry out a collective burial," he said of the unidentified remains.


    Some remains of Guatemala volcano victims unidentified: officialGuatemalan investigators have been unable to identify about 110 pieces of remains from victims of a volcanic eruption that killed 202 people and left 229 missing last June, a forensic official said Saturday. After months of testing, which included sending some samples abroad, about 110 remains cannot be identified, said the head of the National Forensic Sciences Office, Fanuel Garcia. "We have all of them and we are holding on to them, awaiting a time to carry out a collective burial," he said of the unidentified remains.


     

  • US underground nuclear waste dump explained      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 18:53:44 -0400

    US underground nuclear waste dump explainedALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It wasn't long after the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan and World War II ended that the United States began to realize it had to do something with the waste that was being generated by defense-related nuclear research and bomb-making that would continue through the Cold War — and indefinitely.


    US underground nuclear waste dump explainedALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It wasn't long after the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan and World War II ended that the United States began to realize it had to do something with the waste that was being generated by defense-related nuclear research and bomb-making that would continue through the Cold War — and indefinitely.


     

  • First-of-its-kind US nuclear waste dump marks 20 years      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 18:52:06 -0400

    First-of-its-kind US nuclear waste dump marks 20 yearsALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — In a remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment.


    First-of-its-kind US nuclear waste dump marks 20 yearsALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — In a remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment.


     

  • 5,000 breast cancer sufferers could be spared chemotherapy if offered gene testing, study suggests      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 17:00:00 -0400

    5,000 breast cancer sufferers could be spared chemotherapy if offered gene testing, study suggestsTHOUSANDS of women with breast cancer could be spared chemotherapy if they were offered gene tests which show whether their disease is likely to spread, a major trial has found. The British study suggests that up to 5,000 women a year could avoid the toxic treatment, which can cause nausea and fatigue, through wider use of genetic risk profiling. Currently a test called Oncotype DX is offered to around 9,000 patients a year by the NHS when disease has not spread to the lymph nodes. But the new study suggests that the tests could also be used to tailor treatment for around 10,000 patients in whom disease has progressed, identifying which cases require chemotherapy and which can be helped by hormone therapy alone. Scientists said the research by The Royal Marsden Hospital could mean around 5,000 such women are spared chemotherapy, and its associated side-effects. Charities said the results were “promising” - but said further research was needed to assess the long-term outcomes of patients who were put only on hormone treatment. The study examined the use of the tests on breast cancer which is oestrogen receptor positive (ER+),  human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER 2-), where disease had spread to be between one and three lymph nodes. Before the test was used, chemotherapy was recommended for 70 per cent of patients. But after the genetic analysis, just 28 per cent of cases were found to need the treatment. The rest were referred for less aggressive hormone therapy.   Researchers said the analysis, from 582 patients at 30 hospitals, was also able to identify some cases in need of chemotherapy, who would not have been picked up using traditional assessments. Dr Sophie McGrath, Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, said that use of the test saw more than half of cases which would have been recommended for chemotherapy spared it. “This data shows that the Oncotype DX test provides valuable information in guiding treatment decisions for patients whose cancer has spread to the lymph nodes,” she said. More effective targeting of chemotherapy could be particularly valuable among older women, for whom the regime could prove punishing, she said. The test allows scientists to examine the genetic make-up of samples of tumours which are removed during surgery, to discover whether it is likely to spread to other parts of the body. If adopted by the NHS, the tests could reduce expenditure on chemotherapy by around £22 million, and cut waiting times. Latest figures show one in four cancer patients is waiting more than two months to start treatment. Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive at Breast Cancer Now, said such tests had “real potential to personalise breast cancer treatment and enable some women to be safely spared the gruelling side-effects of chemotherapy.” “The early findings from this UK access programme are promising, and suggest that this test could change whether chemotherapy is recommended for a large proportion of node-positive patients. But we need to see long-term data to know that forgoing chemotherapy would not affect the chances of their breast cancer coming back or their survival outcomes,” she said. Currently, the test is only recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) for cases which have not progressed to the lymph nodes but are at “intermediate” risk of spreading. Nice is not expected to update its guidance until 2021. A course of chemotherapy typically costs the health service £4,500. The list price of the Oncotype DX test is £2,500 each, but the NHS pays less for its use under a confidential deal with the manufacturer, Genomic Health.   About | Breast cancer The findings were presented at the St Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference, in Switzerland. Earlier this week, the Health Secretary called for a wider rollout of gene testing on the NHS, as he revealed that tests had found he is at increased risk of prostate cancer. Matt Hancock called for a national debate about the biggest ethical questions concerning a revolution in genomics, as he revealed that he was shocked by his own results.The tests found he has a 15 per cent chance of suffering prostate cancer by the age of 75 - which was described as a risk about 1.5 times greater than the average man. The Health Secretary said he would pursue a blood test with his GP, and ensure he did not miss any screening appointments. But some scientists criticised his statements, with one accusing him of “an astonishing level of ignorance” and suggesting he had “massively misinterpreted” the findings.


    5,000 breast cancer sufferers could be spared chemotherapy if offered gene testing, study suggestsTHOUSANDS of women with breast cancer could be spared chemotherapy if they were offered gene tests which show whether their disease is likely to spread, a major trial has found. The British study suggests that up to 5,000 women a year could avoid the toxic treatment, which can cause nausea and fatigue, through wider use of genetic risk profiling. Currently a test called Oncotype DX is offered to around 9,000 patients a year by the NHS when disease has not spread to the lymph nodes. But the new study suggests that the tests could also be used to tailor treatment for around 10,000 patients in whom disease has progressed, identifying which cases require chemotherapy and which can be helped by hormone therapy alone. Scientists said the research by The Royal Marsden Hospital could mean around 5,000 such women are spared chemotherapy, and its associated side-effects. Charities said the results were “promising” - but said further research was needed to assess the long-term outcomes of patients who were put only on hormone treatment. The study examined the use of the tests on breast cancer which is oestrogen receptor positive (ER+),  human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER 2-), where disease had spread to be between one and three lymph nodes. Before the test was used, chemotherapy was recommended for 70 per cent of patients. But after the genetic analysis, just 28 per cent of cases were found to need the treatment. The rest were referred for less aggressive hormone therapy.   Researchers said the analysis, from 582 patients at 30 hospitals, was also able to identify some cases in need of chemotherapy, who would not have been picked up using traditional assessments. Dr Sophie McGrath, Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, said that use of the test saw more than half of cases which would have been recommended for chemotherapy spared it. “This data shows that the Oncotype DX test provides valuable information in guiding treatment decisions for patients whose cancer has spread to the lymph nodes,” she said. More effective targeting of chemotherapy could be particularly valuable among older women, for whom the regime could prove punishing, she said. The test allows scientists to examine the genetic make-up of samples of tumours which are removed during surgery, to discover whether it is likely to spread to other parts of the body. If adopted by the NHS, the tests could reduce expenditure on chemotherapy by around £22 million, and cut waiting times. Latest figures show one in four cancer patients is waiting more than two months to start treatment. Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive at Breast Cancer Now, said such tests had “real potential to personalise breast cancer treatment and enable some women to be safely spared the gruelling side-effects of chemotherapy.” “The early findings from this UK access programme are promising, and suggest that this test could change whether chemotherapy is recommended for a large proportion of node-positive patients. But we need to see long-term data to know that forgoing chemotherapy would not affect the chances of their breast cancer coming back or their survival outcomes,” she said. Currently, the test is only recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) for cases which have not progressed to the lymph nodes but are at “intermediate” risk of spreading. Nice is not expected to update its guidance until 2021. A course of chemotherapy typically costs the health service £4,500. The list price of the Oncotype DX test is £2,500 each, but the NHS pays less for its use under a confidential deal with the manufacturer, Genomic Health.   About | Breast cancer The findings were presented at the St Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference, in Switzerland. Earlier this week, the Health Secretary called for a wider rollout of gene testing on the NHS, as he revealed that tests had found he is at increased risk of prostate cancer. Matt Hancock called for a national debate about the biggest ethical questions concerning a revolution in genomics, as he revealed that he was shocked by his own results.The tests found he has a 15 per cent chance of suffering prostate cancer by the age of 75 - which was described as a risk about 1.5 times greater than the average man. The Health Secretary said he would pursue a blood test with his GP, and ensure he did not miss any screening appointments. But some scientists criticised his statements, with one accusing him of “an astonishing level of ignorance” and suggesting he had “massively misinterpreted” the findings.


     

  • Bitcoin miner builds electrical transformer in rented space, lawsuit follows      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 15:20:25 -0400

    Bitcoin miner builds electrical transformer in rented space, lawsuit followsDisclaimer: These summaries are provided for educational purposes only by Nelson Rosario and Stephen Palley. They are not legal advice.The post Bitcoin miner builds electrical transformer in rented space, lawsuit follows appeared first on The Block.


    Bitcoin miner builds electrical transformer in rented space, lawsuit followsDisclaimer: These summaries are provided for educational purposes only by Nelson Rosario and Stephen Palley. They are not legal advice.The post Bitcoin miner builds electrical transformer in rented space, lawsuit follows appeared first on The Block.


     

  • Hitler's Air Force Had a Fatal Flaw: No Heavy Bomber (And It Cost Him)      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 15:00:00 -0400

    Hitler's Air Force Had a Fatal Flaw: No Heavy Bomber (And It Cost Him)In the absence of a heavy bomber, the Luftwaffe pushed its medium bombers in World War II to the limits of their endurance.


    Hitler's Air Force Had a Fatal Flaw: No Heavy Bomber (And It Cost Him)In the absence of a heavy bomber, the Luftwaffe pushed its medium bombers in World War II to the limits of their endurance.


     

  • Wow: U.S. gov't warns there's a spring flood risk for two-thirds of the Lower 48      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 14:50:36 -0400

    Wow: U.S. gov't warns there's a spring flood risk for two-thirds of the Lower 48In Nebraska and Iowa there's a brown sea where there should be homes, roads, gas stations, and open country.  Historic floods have deluged vast swaths of the Midwest — even flooding a third of the U.S. Air Force base that houses the nation's critical U.S. Strategic Command. But the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says the floods aren't nearly over. The agency's 2019 Spring Outlook found that nearly two-thirds of the lower 48 states are at risk for flooding in the coming months.  "The extensive flooding we’ve seen in the past two weeks will continue through May and become more dire and may be exacerbated in the coming weeks as the water flows downstream,” Ed Clark, director of NOAA’s National Water Center, said in a statement.  “This is shaping up to be a potentially unprecedented flood season, with more than 200 million people at risk for flooding in their communities.”  None of this is supposed to be under water.Here's what the Missouri River looks like just across from Nebraska City into Iowa. If you ever drive to Kansas City, you're probably familiar with this interchange of I-29 and Highway 2. The Missouri looks like an ocean.#NSP575 pic.twitter.com/kwkkAs5fha — NEStatePatrol (@NEStatePatrol) March 21, 2019 Regions in Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa have already seen historic flooding, with some major rivers — particularly the Missouri River — absolutely smashing previous flood records by some four feet. What's more, many of the nation's well-engineered levees have failed to contain the record floodwaters.  The dramatic flooding — which is already forecast to cost well over $1 billion in damages — is consistent with a big uptick in heavy rains over the last half-century: Between 1958 and 2012, the amount of rain in the heaviest rainfall events in the Midwest shot up by a whopping 37 percent, according to U.S. government scientists.  SEE ALSO: This scientist keeps winning money from people who bet against climate change This is in large part due to Earth's changing atmosphere. Specifically, the climate has warmed by 1 degree Celsius (1.8 Fahrenheit), and because of simple physics, the warmer air is able to hold more water vapor. Specifically, for every 1 degree Celsius of warming, the air can hold seven percent more water.  After the rapid melting of winter snow and deluges of rain in mid-March, NOAA expects the flood risk to continue as more rain falls and then travels down already overloaded rivers. Extreme flooding along the Missouri River. Image: NOAa "As this excess water flows downstream through the river basins, the flood threat will become worse and geographically more widespread," NOAA concluded. The agency forecasts flood risk by accounting for how much snow is left to melt, areas experiencing drought, how saturated soils are with moisture, the depth of frozen soil, the height of rivers, and expected precipitation. As the floodmap shows, regions near the Mississipi river and vast swaths of land in the Great Plains and Midwest are at risk for major and moderate flooding.  NOAA's Spring Outlook flood risk map. Image: noaa After surveying conditions along the Nebraska-Iowa border on Thursday, Nebraska's State Patrol tweeted: "None of this is supposed to be under water."  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


    Wow: U.S. gov't warns there's a spring flood risk for two-thirds of the Lower 48In Nebraska and Iowa there's a brown sea where there should be homes, roads, gas stations, and open country.  Historic floods have deluged vast swaths of the Midwest — even flooding a third of the U.S. Air Force base that houses the nation's critical U.S. Strategic Command. But the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says the floods aren't nearly over. The agency's 2019 Spring Outlook found that nearly two-thirds of the lower 48 states are at risk for flooding in the coming months.  "The extensive flooding we’ve seen in the past two weeks will continue through May and become more dire and may be exacerbated in the coming weeks as the water flows downstream,” Ed Clark, director of NOAA’s National Water Center, said in a statement.  “This is shaping up to be a potentially unprecedented flood season, with more than 200 million people at risk for flooding in their communities.”  None of this is supposed to be under water.Here's what the Missouri River looks like just across from Nebraska City into Iowa. If you ever drive to Kansas City, you're probably familiar with this interchange of I-29 and Highway 2. The Missouri looks like an ocean.#NSP575 pic.twitter.com/kwkkAs5fha — NEStatePatrol (@NEStatePatrol) March 21, 2019 Regions in Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa have already seen historic flooding, with some major rivers — particularly the Missouri River — absolutely smashing previous flood records by some four feet. What's more, many of the nation's well-engineered levees have failed to contain the record floodwaters.  The dramatic flooding — which is already forecast to cost well over $1 billion in damages — is consistent with a big uptick in heavy rains over the last half-century: Between 1958 and 2012, the amount of rain in the heaviest rainfall events in the Midwest shot up by a whopping 37 percent, according to U.S. government scientists.  SEE ALSO: This scientist keeps winning money from people who bet against climate change This is in large part due to Earth's changing atmosphere. Specifically, the climate has warmed by 1 degree Celsius (1.8 Fahrenheit), and because of simple physics, the warmer air is able to hold more water vapor. Specifically, for every 1 degree Celsius of warming, the air can hold seven percent more water.  After the rapid melting of winter snow and deluges of rain in mid-March, NOAA expects the flood risk to continue as more rain falls and then travels down already overloaded rivers. Extreme flooding along the Missouri River. Image: NOAa "As this excess water flows downstream through the river basins, the flood threat will become worse and geographically more widespread," NOAA concluded. The agency forecasts flood risk by accounting for how much snow is left to melt, areas experiencing drought, how saturated soils are with moisture, the depth of frozen soil, the height of rivers, and expected precipitation. As the floodmap shows, regions near the Mississipi river and vast swaths of land in the Great Plains and Midwest are at risk for major and moderate flooding.  NOAA's Spring Outlook flood risk map. Image: noaa After surveying conditions along the Nebraska-Iowa border on Thursday, Nebraska's State Patrol tweeted: "None of this is supposed to be under water."  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


     

  • U.S. Army Tanks Want Some Very High-Tech Fighter Gear      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 14:00:00 -0400

    U.S. Army Tanks Want Some Very High-Tech Fighter GearThe vehicle display project comes as the U.S. Army grapples with how to replace its Cold War tanks and armored vehicles with twenty-first-century designs.


    U.S. Army Tanks Want Some Very High-Tech Fighter GearThe vehicle display project comes as the U.S. Army grapples with how to replace its Cold War tanks and armored vehicles with twenty-first-century designs.


     

  • Houston petrochemical disaster stretches to sixth day, impacting key port      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 13:53:21 -0400

    Houston petrochemical disaster stretches to sixth day, impacting key portFallout from a petrochemical fire outside Houston continued for a sixth day on Saturday, with emergency workers struggling to remove volatile fuels from exposed tanks and ship traffic disrupted on the nation's busiest oil port. A fire that burned for three days broke out last Sunday at Mitsui & Co's Intercontinental Terminals Co site in Deer Park, Texas. On Friday, flames again erupted for an hour and halted efforts to remove volatile fuels that leaked when a containment wall breached.


    Houston petrochemical disaster stretches to sixth day, impacting key portFallout from a petrochemical fire outside Houston continued for a sixth day on Saturday, with emergency workers struggling to remove volatile fuels from exposed tanks and ship traffic disrupted on the nation's busiest oil port. A fire that burned for three days broke out last Sunday at Mitsui & Co's Intercontinental Terminals Co site in Deer Park, Texas. On Friday, flames again erupted for an hour and halted efforts to remove volatile fuels that leaked when a containment wall breached.


     

  • If you live in the northern U.S., you could see a radiant celestial treat Saturday night      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 13:08:15 -0400

    If you live in the northern U.S., you could see a radiant celestial treat Saturday nightSome of us Earthlings may see dancing, green lights in the sky on Saturday night. The sun blasted out a flare of energized particles into space on March 20, and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Prediction Center forecasts that a strip of the northern U.S. may experience a visible effect of this event: an aurora, or eerie dancing greenish light, created when the sun's particles interact with Earth's atmosphere. Such an atmospheric event is stoked by a disturbance called a geomagnetic storm, where energized solar particles propel changes in Earth's magnetosphere — a sprawling zone of space around Earth where the planet's magnetic field changes and evolves in reaction to the sun.  It often takes a few days for powerful flares from the sun, known as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), to hit Earth and stoke a space storm. NOAA's aurora forecast for March 23, 2019. Image: NOAA/Storm Prediction Center The Space Prediction Center predicts that a curved strip of land in the U.S. between Washington and Maine is the "most likely" extent of the celestial lights, though areas as far south as Colorado may be treated to the aurora. SEE ALSO: How NASA recorded the eerie Martian wind, without a microphone This furthest extent is forecast to fall between the green and yellow lines seen in the above NOAA graphic, or the tweet below. This means portions of Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. A G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm watch is in effect for the 23 March, 2019 UTC-day due to anticipated CME arrival. The CME was associated with a C4 flare on 20 March, 2019 at 1118 UTC (0718 EDT). Continue to monitor our SWPC webpage for additional updates. pic.twitter.com/tjZIGFiLSz — NOAA Space Weather (@NWSSWPC) March 20, 2019 While the Lower 48 may glimpse some green light, the event is expected to be quite vivid over a majority of Alaska, where the epicenter of the aurora will be on impressive display in a ring atop the planet.  To see the lights, it's best to view in the darkest night skies possible, away from light pollution, and if possible, before the moon rises.  Happy celestial viewing. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


    If you live in the northern U.S., you could see a radiant celestial treat Saturday nightSome of us Earthlings may see dancing, green lights in the sky on Saturday night. The sun blasted out a flare of energized particles into space on March 20, and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Prediction Center forecasts that a strip of the northern U.S. may experience a visible effect of this event: an aurora, or eerie dancing greenish light, created when the sun's particles interact with Earth's atmosphere. Such an atmospheric event is stoked by a disturbance called a geomagnetic storm, where energized solar particles propel changes in Earth's magnetosphere — a sprawling zone of space around Earth where the planet's magnetic field changes and evolves in reaction to the sun.  It often takes a few days for powerful flares from the sun, known as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), to hit Earth and stoke a space storm. NOAA's aurora forecast for March 23, 2019. Image: NOAA/Storm Prediction Center The Space Prediction Center predicts that a curved strip of land in the U.S. between Washington and Maine is the "most likely" extent of the celestial lights, though areas as far south as Colorado may be treated to the aurora. SEE ALSO: How NASA recorded the eerie Martian wind, without a microphone This furthest extent is forecast to fall between the green and yellow lines seen in the above NOAA graphic, or the tweet below. This means portions of Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. A G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm watch is in effect for the 23 March, 2019 UTC-day due to anticipated CME arrival. The CME was associated with a C4 flare on 20 March, 2019 at 1118 UTC (0718 EDT). Continue to monitor our SWPC webpage for additional updates. pic.twitter.com/tjZIGFiLSz — NOAA Space Weather (@NWSSWPC) March 20, 2019 While the Lower 48 may glimpse some green light, the event is expected to be quite vivid over a majority of Alaska, where the epicenter of the aurora will be on impressive display in a ring atop the planet.  To see the lights, it's best to view in the darkest night skies possible, away from light pollution, and if possible, before the moon rises.  Happy celestial viewing. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


     

  • These Weighted Blankets Can Alleviate Stress and Anxiety      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 13:00:00 -0400

    These Weighted Blankets Can Alleviate Stress and AnxietyGet an extra 15 percent off these weighted blankets.


    These Weighted Blankets Can Alleviate Stress and AnxietyGet an extra 15 percent off these weighted blankets.


     

  • Transgender men have functional ovaries after a year of testosterone injections      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 12:55:08 -0400

    Transgender men have functional ovaries after a year of testosterone injectionsThe ovaries of transgender men appear to remain functional even after a year of receiving hormonal treatment with testosterone, according to a small Israeli study presented Saturday in the United States. Transgender men are born female but self-identify as male. Doctors from Tel Aviv-Sourasky Medical Center studied 52 transgender men aged between 17 and 40 for a year after they began receiving injections of testosterone.


    Transgender men have functional ovaries after a year of testosterone injectionsThe ovaries of transgender men appear to remain functional even after a year of receiving hormonal treatment with testosterone, according to a small Israeli study presented Saturday in the United States. Transgender men are born female but self-identify as male. Doctors from Tel Aviv-Sourasky Medical Center studied 52 transgender men aged between 17 and 40 for a year after they began receiving injections of testosterone.


     

  • 3 Cancer Treatment Stocks to Buy in March      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 12:14:00 -0400

    3 Cancer Treatment Stocks to Buy in MarchFind out why these oncology-focused companies stand out as great opportunities right now.


    3 Cancer Treatment Stocks to Buy in MarchFind out why these oncology-focused companies stand out as great opportunities right now.


     

  • American anti-vaxxers quarantined after children contract measles in Costa Rica's first case for 13 years      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 12:07:50 -0400

    American anti-vaxxers quarantined after children contract measles in Costa Rica's first case for 13 yearsTwo American children who had not been vaccinated by their parents have fallen ill with measles in Costa Rica, in the first case to originate in the country for 13 years. The Ministry of Health announced that it tested four American children between the ages of three and 10, who displayed symptoms of the disease after being treated at a clinic in the Cóbano region. The parents, who are American citizens with five more children, never vaccinated their kids for measles.


    American anti-vaxxers quarantined after children contract measles in Costa Rica's first case for 13 yearsTwo American children who had not been vaccinated by their parents have fallen ill with measles in Costa Rica, in the first case to originate in the country for 13 years. The Ministry of Health announced that it tested four American children between the ages of three and 10, who displayed symptoms of the disease after being treated at a clinic in the Cóbano region. The parents, who are American citizens with five more children, never vaccinated their kids for measles.


     

  • Italy endorses China's Belt and Road plan in first for a G7 nation      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 11:14:47 -0400

    Italy endorses China's Belt and Road plan in first for a G7 nationSaturday's signing ceremony was the highlight of a three-day trip to Italy by Chinese President Xi Jinping, with the two nations boosting their ties at a time when the United States is locked in a trade war with China. The rapprochement has angered Washington and alarmed some European Union allies, who fear it could see Beijing gain access to sensitive technologies and critical transport hubs. Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio played down such concerns, telling reporters that although Rome remained fully committed to its Western partners, it had to put Italy first when it came to commercial ties.


    Italy endorses China's Belt and Road plan in first for a G7 nationSaturday's signing ceremony was the highlight of a three-day trip to Italy by Chinese President Xi Jinping, with the two nations boosting their ties at a time when the United States is locked in a trade war with China. The rapprochement has angered Washington and alarmed some European Union allies, who fear it could see Beijing gain access to sensitive technologies and critical transport hubs. Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio played down such concerns, telling reporters that although Rome remained fully committed to its Western partners, it had to put Italy first when it came to commercial ties.


     

  • FEMA Improperly Released Personal Information of 2.3 Million Disaster Victims      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 10:46:14 -0400

    FEMA Improperly Released Personal Information of 2.3 Million Disaster VictimsPersonal details including individuals’ home addresses and bank account numbers -- data that exposes victims to potential identity theft and fraud -- were improperly given to a contractor hired by FEMA to provide temporary housing to victims of hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and California wildfires in 2017, according to a memo released on Friday by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General. FEMA provided more information than necessary to the vendor and has since taken steps to correct the error, FEMA spokeswoman Lizzie Litzow said in an emailed statement. In addition, there’s no indication that any of the 2.3 million people’s personal data has been compromised, she said.


    FEMA Improperly Released Personal Information of 2.3 Million Disaster VictimsPersonal details including individuals’ home addresses and bank account numbers -- data that exposes victims to potential identity theft and fraud -- were improperly given to a contractor hired by FEMA to provide temporary housing to victims of hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and California wildfires in 2017, according to a memo released on Friday by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General. FEMA provided more information than necessary to the vendor and has since taken steps to correct the error, FEMA spokeswoman Lizzie Litzow said in an emailed statement. In addition, there’s no indication that any of the 2.3 million people’s personal data has been compromised, she said.


     

  • NASA posts image of a powerful fireball exploding over Earth      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 10:33:13 -0400

    NASA posts image of a powerful fireball exploding over EarthBoom. A radiant fireball exploded over the remote Bering Sea in Dec. 2018, though it wasn't until some three months later that scientists, scouring satellite images, discovered the dramatic event. NASA's Terra satellite — an Earth-observing satellite the size of a small school bus — also unwittingly documented the fiery explosion, and the space agency released photos of the meteor's violent passage through Earth's atmosphere on Friday. Fireballs — which are bright meteors breaking apart in the atmosphere — are common events, though this December explosion was quite potent, as the most powerful known fireball since 2013. "The explosion unleashed an estimated 173 kilotons of energy, or more than 10 times the energy of the atomic bomb blast over Hiroshima during World War II," NASA said on Friday. Fireball over the Bering Sea. Image: nasa NASA's GIF shows both the meteor's trail and an orange-colored cloud that the exploded space rock left behind.  SEE ALSO: NASA dropped a space exploration robot into Cape Cod’s waters to reach the darkest unknowns A meteor needn't be too big to make a vibrant scene. The object was just a few meters across, noted astrophysicist Caleb Scharf. But its steep angle and high velocity helped this speeding space rock pack a punch.  It's difficult for most meteors to survive a descent through Earth's atmosphere, as they're baked and scorched by friction while plummeting through the sky.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


    NASA posts image of a powerful fireball exploding over EarthBoom. A radiant fireball exploded over the remote Bering Sea in Dec. 2018, though it wasn't until some three months later that scientists, scouring satellite images, discovered the dramatic event. NASA's Terra satellite — an Earth-observing satellite the size of a small school bus — also unwittingly documented the fiery explosion, and the space agency released photos of the meteor's violent passage through Earth's atmosphere on Friday. Fireballs — which are bright meteors breaking apart in the atmosphere — are common events, though this December explosion was quite potent, as the most powerful known fireball since 2013. "The explosion unleashed an estimated 173 kilotons of energy, or more than 10 times the energy of the atomic bomb blast over Hiroshima during World War II," NASA said on Friday. Fireball over the Bering Sea. Image: nasa NASA's GIF shows both the meteor's trail and an orange-colored cloud that the exploded space rock left behind.  SEE ALSO: NASA dropped a space exploration robot into Cape Cod’s waters to reach the darkest unknowns A meteor needn't be too big to make a vibrant scene. The object was just a few meters across, noted astrophysicist Caleb Scharf. But its steep angle and high velocity helped this speeding space rock pack a punch.  It's difficult for most meteors to survive a descent through Earth's atmosphere, as they're baked and scorched by friction while plummeting through the sky.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


     

  • How the Navy Wants to Take on Russian and Chinese Submarines: Robot Subs      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 10:00:00 -0400

    How the Navy Wants to Take on Russian and Chinese Submarines: Robot SubsCould that be the future?


    How the Navy Wants to Take on Russian and Chinese Submarines: Robot SubsCould that be the future?


     

  • Drinking One Coke A Day Could Cause Colon Cancer, Study Reveals      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 09:27:00 -0400

    Drinking One Coke A Day Could Cause Colon Cancer, Study RevealsIt's time to cut the addiction.


    Drinking One Coke A Day Could Cause Colon Cancer, Study RevealsIt's time to cut the addiction.


     

  • Finishing What Darwin Began      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 06:30:40 -0400

    Finishing What Darwin BeganIn This View of Life: Completing the Darwinian Revolution, evolutionary biologist David Sloan Wilson continues the project of scientific imperialism that has defined much of the latter part of his career. This View of Life takes as given that humans are shaped by our evolutionary past, and proceeds to show how general principles derived from the discipline can be applied to policy decisions and social problems, guiding our species-wide goals to further our flourishing. Wilson aims to break evolution out of its biological box, offering it as a universal framework for understanding and shaping human phenomena.This is an ambitious program. But first one has to address the historical elephant in the room: the misapplication of evolutionary principles. The prosecution argues that evolution stands of accused of aiding and abetting the abominations that culminated in Nazi Germany. After the defeat of Hitler’s regime, evolutionary theory retreated into the redoubt of biology, concerning itself with natural history, laboratory experiments, and abstruse mathematical models. And there it should stay, argue its critics, lest we repeat the mistakes of the past.David Sloan Wilson rejects this argument in totality. He notes that the opprobrium hurled at evolution’s application to social problems draws from Richard Hofstadter’s Social Darwinism in American Thought. Hofstadter was a man of left-wing commitments writing in 1944, as the war against Hitler’s regime was still a live concern. His was not a dispassionate scholarly analysis. He aimed to produce something which could be deployed in the fight against “racism, nationalism, or competitive strife.”This View of Life highlights how men as diverse as Darwin, Herbert Spencer, Francis Galton, and Thomas Malthus were not united in their views, nor were they the cruel anti-humanitarians that their detractors portray them as (Hitler’s own views were scientifically inchoate at best, and ignorant at worst). Wilson’s arguments are familiar to libertarians in particular, many of whom have long argued that Hofstadter misrepresented classical liberals.The argument for the defense that one encounters in This View of Life may not entirely convince, at least in the chapter-length treatment Wilson provides. The great evolutionary geneticist R. A. Fisher’s central work, Genetical Theory of Natural Selection, contains a long exposition of eugenicist thought as applied to humanity. To not put too fine a point on this, contemporary readers invariably find this section quite offensive. And yet Fisher himself was a complicated figure, a patriotic British Tory conservative and Anglican Christian. The past was truly a different age.Most of This View of Life, though, presents a forward-looking positive vision, not a backward-looking apologia. Wilson argues cogently that humanity, both in its biology and its culture, is a product of evolution. The central pillars of his narrative are the “four major questions” elucidated by the ethologist Niko Tinbergen in the 20th century as essential aspects of any evolutionary analysis. First, what is the function of a trait? Second, what is the history of the trait over many generations? Third, what is the physical mechanism of the trait? Finally, how does the trait develop during the history of the particular organism?At this point you may wonder how Wilson applies these questions outside of biology, in religion for example, thereby completing the Darwinian revolution. Though This View of Life touches upon religion, it is in an earlier book, Darwin's Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society, that he elaborates in detail how religious belief systems are evolutionarily shaped cultural phenomena.Consider the trait of missionary activity. The function of the trait is to increase the flock and bear witness to the message of salvation. In regards to its history, the earliest records of missions go back to Buddhism, many centuries before Christ, during the reign of the Emperor Ashoka. The trait seems to have become common in many Roman “mystery religions,” culminating with Christianity, and later adopted by Islam, evolving over time in vigor and centrality to various faiths. The mechanism is straightforward. Believers leave their homelands and propagate their views. Finally, the nature of missionary activity has changed in many religions over time, as aims and methods have been refined – changes that develop through selection.A specific religion can be thought of as a cultural organism. Consider the Western Christian tradition – the Roman Catholic Church and the eruption of the Reformation. It made forays into organized missionary work under Gregory the Great in the sixth century a.d., but it truly refined the process in the 16th and 17th centuries with the emergence of orders such as Jesuits – missionary arms of the Church tasked with countering the spread of Protestantism – taking the faith across the oceans to new lands.The application of evolutionary principles to religion illustrates that This View of Life is not wedded to genetics. Genetics revolutionized our understanding of evolution in the 20th century, but in our time Wilson wants to push evolution beyond its genetic basis. All that evolution requires is inheritance of characteristics. This vision is grounded strongly on a “multi-level” understanding of organismic complexity, extending ideas Wilson developed in the early part of his career. In the biological context, that means viewing organisms from their simplest level – that of the gene – up to the individual, above that to kin groups, and then to large entities such as tribes and nations. And once you extend your analysis to large groups, cultural processes become much more powerful than biological ones.Due to its ambition, This View of Life takes aim at the incumbent imperium of applied social science: economics. Wilson has no time for the utilitarian individualism of neoclassical economics and its fixation on static equilibria. He rejects Homo economicus as intellectually impoverished, with thin insights not conducive to fostering human flourishing. Just as with the refutation of the arguments popularized by Hofstadter, skeptics may raise their eyebrows at the broad-brush dismissal of economics in Wilson’s narrative, but the thing to focus on is the alternative vision he presents. You can set This View of Life next to Tim Harford’s The Logic of Life: The Rational Economics of an Irrational World with no guilt.It is simply a fact that humans are fundamentally social animals. Though the liberal vision emphasizes the centrality of the individual in terms of worth, our evolutionary history suggests that human uniqueness lies in our incredible sociality and cultural creativity. Individual human beings exist, but so do a wide range of social organizations. Consider the various city-states of ancient Greece, with their myriad political systems, or the communes of the Burned-over District of upstate New York in the 19th century after the Second Great Awakening. Religions, civic associations, and polities: These are all unique and ubiquitous to our species.Evolution on the individual level favors selfishness, as one might see in Homo economicus. Greed is, on the one level, good. But Wilson shows that in the broader context of animal breeding, maximizing the most “fit” lineages results in lower overall productivity, as rapacious individuals tear down the social fabrics on which they rely to exist. It is often the case that selection for groups of cooperative organisms, who may on an individual level be less impressive, results in greater yield. Evolution is more than the sum of its parts.And so it is with human societies, as the total drive toward selfishness leads to a war of all against all, and social collapse. Homo economicus may win against other members of their own tribe, but their tribe always loses to Homo sapiens, which is a much less rapacious creature. This View of Life presents a progressive vision of human complexity increasing over the eons, as bands becomes clans, and clans become tribes, and tribes become nations. The ultimate level of organization Wilson envisions is a global one.But here he does not imagine a centralized, top-down leviathan. Rather, he posits iterative experimentation as an essential feature of evolutionary systems, which evolve and change over time. They depend not on eternal equilibriums, but on contemporary responses to current conditions. Wilson inveighs against laissez-faire, but does not offer up as a utopian uniform alternative a centralized command economy. Evolution is not top-down design, as might apply to a physical system, but bottom-up adaptation and experimentation, as is the norm in biological systems. Small businesses, civic associations, localities, and nonprofits will likely drive social change and advancement on a global scale in the view promulgated in Wilson’s narrative. They incentivize innovation and promote what works.This View of Life begins with a discussion of the ideas of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, an evolutionary biologist, Jesuit priest, and philosopher, whose impact in the 20th century has been largely forgotten in the 21st century. It concludes with a frank admission that Wilson is aspiring to the same aim of de Chardin’s work in The Phenomenon of Man, which argued that humanity is pushing forward the project of increased social complexity so that there will evolve a supreme-consciousness, the “Omega Point.” In a broad sense Wilson too aspires to the Omega Point. He states that the “evolutionary worldview” in This View of Life is an ethic, while “evolutionary theory” is simply a description. This is a large step for a scientist – so large that it changes his work from that of a scientist to that of a pundit.Most evolutionary biologists would no doubt feel The Phenomenon of Man is a bizarre work. Richard Dawkins has praised sharp critiques of The Phenomenon of Man. In his scientific work Dawkins has suggested that humanity is good not in spite of its nature, but because of it. Similarly, many scientists will look askance at the grand claims Wilson promotes in This View of Life, as he mixes “is” and “ought,” jumping from a positive description of reality to normative prescriptions for human happiness and well-being.In contrast, religious conservatives may see Wilson’s visions as materialistic and hubristic. Its ultimate evolutionary basis, and nearly messianic aims, ensure that This View of Life will alarm many traditionalists.The fact is, one can argue that Wilson’s This View of Life is all of these things, and that the author believes in the importance of his vision to such an extent that he is not particularly concerned with causing alarm. Wilson begins the book as an evolutionary biologist, describing the facts as they are. He ends it like de Chardin, an evolutionary priest, preaching to the unconverted the good news at hand.


    Finishing What Darwin BeganIn This View of Life: Completing the Darwinian Revolution, evolutionary biologist David Sloan Wilson continues the project of scientific imperialism that has defined much of the latter part of his career. This View of Life takes as given that humans are shaped by our evolutionary past, and proceeds to show how general principles derived from the discipline can be applied to policy decisions and social problems, guiding our species-wide goals to further our flourishing. Wilson aims to break evolution out of its biological box, offering it as a universal framework for understanding and shaping human phenomena.This is an ambitious program. But first one has to address the historical elephant in the room: the misapplication of evolutionary principles. The prosecution argues that evolution stands of accused of aiding and abetting the abominations that culminated in Nazi Germany. After the defeat of Hitler’s regime, evolutionary theory retreated into the redoubt of biology, concerning itself with natural history, laboratory experiments, and abstruse mathematical models. And there it should stay, argue its critics, lest we repeat the mistakes of the past.David Sloan Wilson rejects this argument in totality. He notes that the opprobrium hurled at evolution’s application to social problems draws from Richard Hofstadter’s Social Darwinism in American Thought. Hofstadter was a man of left-wing commitments writing in 1944, as the war against Hitler’s regime was still a live concern. His was not a dispassionate scholarly analysis. He aimed to produce something which could be deployed in the fight against “racism, nationalism, or competitive strife.”This View of Life highlights how men as diverse as Darwin, Herbert Spencer, Francis Galton, and Thomas Malthus were not united in their views, nor were they the cruel anti-humanitarians that their detractors portray them as (Hitler’s own views were scientifically inchoate at best, and ignorant at worst). Wilson’s arguments are familiar to libertarians in particular, many of whom have long argued that Hofstadter misrepresented classical liberals.The argument for the defense that one encounters in This View of Life may not entirely convince, at least in the chapter-length treatment Wilson provides. The great evolutionary geneticist R. A. Fisher’s central work, Genetical Theory of Natural Selection, contains a long exposition of eugenicist thought as applied to humanity. To not put too fine a point on this, contemporary readers invariably find this section quite offensive. And yet Fisher himself was a complicated figure, a patriotic British Tory conservative and Anglican Christian. The past was truly a different age.Most of This View of Life, though, presents a forward-looking positive vision, not a backward-looking apologia. Wilson argues cogently that humanity, both in its biology and its culture, is a product of evolution. The central pillars of his narrative are the “four major questions” elucidated by the ethologist Niko Tinbergen in the 20th century as essential aspects of any evolutionary analysis. First, what is the function of a trait? Second, what is the history of the trait over many generations? Third, what is the physical mechanism of the trait? Finally, how does the trait develop during the history of the particular organism?At this point you may wonder how Wilson applies these questions outside of biology, in religion for example, thereby completing the Darwinian revolution. Though This View of Life touches upon religion, it is in an earlier book, Darwin's Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society, that he elaborates in detail how religious belief systems are evolutionarily shaped cultural phenomena.Consider the trait of missionary activity. The function of the trait is to increase the flock and bear witness to the message of salvation. In regards to its history, the earliest records of missions go back to Buddhism, many centuries before Christ, during the reign of the Emperor Ashoka. The trait seems to have become common in many Roman “mystery religions,” culminating with Christianity, and later adopted by Islam, evolving over time in vigor and centrality to various faiths. The mechanism is straightforward. Believers leave their homelands and propagate their views. Finally, the nature of missionary activity has changed in many religions over time, as aims and methods have been refined – changes that develop through selection.A specific religion can be thought of as a cultural organism. Consider the Western Christian tradition – the Roman Catholic Church and the eruption of the Reformation. It made forays into organized missionary work under Gregory the Great in the sixth century a.d., but it truly refined the process in the 16th and 17th centuries with the emergence of orders such as Jesuits – missionary arms of the Church tasked with countering the spread of Protestantism – taking the faith across the oceans to new lands.The application of evolutionary principles to religion illustrates that This View of Life is not wedded to genetics. Genetics revolutionized our understanding of evolution in the 20th century, but in our time Wilson wants to push evolution beyond its genetic basis. All that evolution requires is inheritance of characteristics. This vision is grounded strongly on a “multi-level” understanding of organismic complexity, extending ideas Wilson developed in the early part of his career. In the biological context, that means viewing organisms from their simplest level – that of the gene – up to the individual, above that to kin groups, and then to large entities such as tribes and nations. And once you extend your analysis to large groups, cultural processes become much more powerful than biological ones.Due to its ambition, This View of Life takes aim at the incumbent imperium of applied social science: economics. Wilson has no time for the utilitarian individualism of neoclassical economics and its fixation on static equilibria. He rejects Homo economicus as intellectually impoverished, with thin insights not conducive to fostering human flourishing. Just as with the refutation of the arguments popularized by Hofstadter, skeptics may raise their eyebrows at the broad-brush dismissal of economics in Wilson’s narrative, but the thing to focus on is the alternative vision he presents. You can set This View of Life next to Tim Harford’s The Logic of Life: The Rational Economics of an Irrational World with no guilt.It is simply a fact that humans are fundamentally social animals. Though the liberal vision emphasizes the centrality of the individual in terms of worth, our evolutionary history suggests that human uniqueness lies in our incredible sociality and cultural creativity. Individual human beings exist, but so do a wide range of social organizations. Consider the various city-states of ancient Greece, with their myriad political systems, or the communes of the Burned-over District of upstate New York in the 19th century after the Second Great Awakening. Religions, civic associations, and polities: These are all unique and ubiquitous to our species.Evolution on the individual level favors selfishness, as one might see in Homo economicus. Greed is, on the one level, good. But Wilson shows that in the broader context of animal breeding, maximizing the most “fit” lineages results in lower overall productivity, as rapacious individuals tear down the social fabrics on which they rely to exist. It is often the case that selection for groups of cooperative organisms, who may on an individual level be less impressive, results in greater yield. Evolution is more than the sum of its parts.And so it is with human societies, as the total drive toward selfishness leads to a war of all against all, and social collapse. Homo economicus may win against other members of their own tribe, but their tribe always loses to Homo sapiens, which is a much less rapacious creature. This View of Life presents a progressive vision of human complexity increasing over the eons, as bands becomes clans, and clans become tribes, and tribes become nations. The ultimate level of organization Wilson envisions is a global one.But here he does not imagine a centralized, top-down leviathan. Rather, he posits iterative experimentation as an essential feature of evolutionary systems, which evolve and change over time. They depend not on eternal equilibriums, but on contemporary responses to current conditions. Wilson inveighs against laissez-faire, but does not offer up as a utopian uniform alternative a centralized command economy. Evolution is not top-down design, as might apply to a physical system, but bottom-up adaptation and experimentation, as is the norm in biological systems. Small businesses, civic associations, localities, and nonprofits will likely drive social change and advancement on a global scale in the view promulgated in Wilson’s narrative. They incentivize innovation and promote what works.This View of Life begins with a discussion of the ideas of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, an evolutionary biologist, Jesuit priest, and philosopher, whose impact in the 20th century has been largely forgotten in the 21st century. It concludes with a frank admission that Wilson is aspiring to the same aim of de Chardin’s work in The Phenomenon of Man, which argued that humanity is pushing forward the project of increased social complexity so that there will evolve a supreme-consciousness, the “Omega Point.” In a broad sense Wilson too aspires to the Omega Point. He states that the “evolutionary worldview” in This View of Life is an ethic, while “evolutionary theory” is simply a description. This is a large step for a scientist – so large that it changes his work from that of a scientist to that of a pundit.Most evolutionary biologists would no doubt feel The Phenomenon of Man is a bizarre work. Richard Dawkins has praised sharp critiques of The Phenomenon of Man. In his scientific work Dawkins has suggested that humanity is good not in spite of its nature, but because of it. Similarly, many scientists will look askance at the grand claims Wilson promotes in This View of Life, as he mixes “is” and “ought,” jumping from a positive description of reality to normative prescriptions for human happiness and well-being.In contrast, religious conservatives may see Wilson’s visions as materialistic and hubristic. Its ultimate evolutionary basis, and nearly messianic aims, ensure that This View of Life will alarm many traditionalists.The fact is, one can argue that Wilson’s This View of Life is all of these things, and that the author believes in the importance of his vision to such an extent that he is not particularly concerned with causing alarm. Wilson begins the book as an evolutionary biologist, describing the facts as they are. He ends it like de Chardin, an evolutionary priest, preaching to the unconverted the good news at hand.


     

  • Hundreds of Algerian lawyers protest against Bouteflika      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 06:24:58 -0400

    Hundreds of Algerian lawyers protest against BouteflikaHundreds of Algerian lawyers protested again on Saturday in the capital to demand the immediate resignation of President Abdelaziz Bouteflika who has been for 20 years in power. The powerful military has been watching the protests unfold.


    Hundreds of Algerian lawyers protest against BouteflikaHundreds of Algerian lawyers protested again on Saturday in the capital to demand the immediate resignation of President Abdelaziz Bouteflika who has been for 20 years in power. The powerful military has been watching the protests unfold.


     

  • Apple's Reinvention as a Services Company Starts for Real Monday      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 06:00:00 -0400

    Apple's Reinvention as a Services Company Starts for Real MondayThe chief executive officer is expected to unveil streaming video and news subscriptions, key parts of Apple’s push to transform itself into a leading digital services provider. The company may even discuss a monthly video games subscription. Likely absent from the event: Any new versions of the gadgets that have helped Apple generate hundreds of billions of dollars in profit since 1976.


    Apple's Reinvention as a Services Company Starts for Real MondayThe chief executive officer is expected to unveil streaming video and news subscriptions, key parts of Apple’s push to transform itself into a leading digital services provider. The company may even discuss a monthly video games subscription. Likely absent from the event: Any new versions of the gadgets that have helped Apple generate hundreds of billions of dollars in profit since 1976.


     

  • 7 ‘Hidden’ Things I Don't Let Show About My Life With Primary Immune Deficiency      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 04:03:48 -0400

    7 ‘Hidden’ Things I Don't Let Show About My Life With Primary Immune DeficiencyA woman with primary immune deficiency shares things about her life that others can't immediately 'see.'


    7 ‘Hidden’ Things I Don't Let Show About My Life With Primary Immune DeficiencyA woman with primary immune deficiency shares things about her life that others can't immediately 'see.'


     

  • China's F-16: Meet the J-10 Fighter (Possibly Thanks to Israel)      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 02:00:00 -0400

    China's F-16: Meet the J-10 Fighter (Possibly Thanks to Israel)Here's what happened.


    China's F-16: Meet the J-10 Fighter (Possibly Thanks to Israel)Here's what happened.


     

  • Tyrannosaurus rex found in Canada is world's biggest      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 01:58:25 -0400

    Tyrannosaurus rex found in Canada is world's biggestThe towering Tyrannosaurus rex discovered in western Canada in 1991 is the world's biggest, a team of paleontologists said Friday, following a decades-long process of reconstructing its skeleton. Nicknamed Scotty for a celebratory bottle of scotch consumed the night it was discovered, the T. rex was 13 meters (yards) long and probably weighed more than 8,800 kilos (19,400 pounds), making it bigger than all other carnivorous dinosaurs, the team from the University of Alberta said. "This is the rex of rexes," said Scott Persons, lead author of the study and postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Biological Sciences.


    Tyrannosaurus rex found in Canada is world's biggestThe towering Tyrannosaurus rex discovered in western Canada in 1991 is the world's biggest, a team of paleontologists said Friday, following a decades-long process of reconstructing its skeleton. Nicknamed Scotty for a celebratory bottle of scotch consumed the night it was discovered, the T. rex was 13 meters (yards) long and probably weighed more than 8,800 kilos (19,400 pounds), making it bigger than all other carnivorous dinosaurs, the team from the University of Alberta said. "This is the rex of rexes," said Scott Persons, lead author of the study and postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Biological Sciences.


     

  • Twin cyclones batter Australia      Sat, 23 Mar 2019 01:57:00 -0400

    Twin cyclones batter AustraliaA "very destructive" category 4 cyclone slammed into Australia's remote northern coast on Saturday, while a second, equally powerful storm bore down on the country's west. Cyclone Trevor, pushing a big storm tide and packing winds of up to 250 kilometres per hour (150 mph), made landfall on the sparsely populated Northern Territory coast near the Gulf of Carpentaria town of Port McArthur, the Bureau of Meteorology reported. The storm was downgraded to a category 3 shortly after making landfall, and was expected to weaken further as it travelled inland, though officials warned of heavy rains and flooding.


    Twin cyclones batter AustraliaA "very destructive" category 4 cyclone slammed into Australia's remote northern coast on Saturday, while a second, equally powerful storm bore down on the country's west. Cyclone Trevor, pushing a big storm tide and packing winds of up to 250 kilometres per hour (150 mph), made landfall on the sparsely populated Northern Territory coast near the Gulf of Carpentaria town of Port McArthur, the Bureau of Meteorology reported. The storm was downgraded to a category 3 shortly after making landfall, and was expected to weaken further as it travelled inland, though officials warned of heavy rains and flooding.


     



Copyright 1997-2011 SQLData System, Inc  All rights reserved.

Comments, or suggestions? Send to info2 at sqldata.com

This site is powered by SQLData SOAP Server