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ChannelYahoo News - Latest News & Headlines    
RSS File: https://news.yahoo.com/rss/science
Description: The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.
  • Environmental activists pluck plastic from world's beaches on mass cleanup day      Sat, 21 Sep 2019 14:14:35 -0400

    Environmental activists pluck plastic from world's beaches on mass cleanup dayThousands of volunteers wielding nets and bin bags scoured coasts, parks and riverbanks across the globe Saturday, in a litter-picking drive highlighting the vast quantity of trash dumped worldwide, a day after mass international climate protests. Campaigners took part in World Cleanup Day from Manila to the Mediterranean, as hundreds of thousands of people across the world take part in demonstrations and activities calling for urgent action on the environment. Young people have been at the forefront of the movement, with masses of children skipping school on Friday for a global climate strike, which teen activist Greta Thunberg said was "only the beginning".


    Environmental activists pluck plastic from world's beaches on mass cleanup dayThousands of volunteers wielding nets and bin bags scoured coasts, parks and riverbanks across the globe Saturday, in a litter-picking drive highlighting the vast quantity of trash dumped worldwide, a day after mass international climate protests. Campaigners took part in World Cleanup Day from Manila to the Mediterranean, as hundreds of thousands of people across the world take part in demonstrations and activities calling for urgent action on the environment. Young people have been at the forefront of the movement, with masses of children skipping school on Friday for a global climate strike, which teen activist Greta Thunberg said was "only the beginning".


     

  • A year in the ice: Scientists set sail on Arctic expedition      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 16:42:04 -0400

    A year in the ice: Scientists set sail on Arctic expeditionAn international team of researchers set off Friday on the biggest and most complex expedition ever attempted in the central Arctic, a yearlong journey they hope will sharpen the scientific models that underpin human understanding of climate change. The 140-million euro ($158 million) expedition into the ice will see 600 scientists from 19 countries, including Germany, the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China, work together in one of the most inhospitable regions of the planet. "The Arctic is the epicenter of global climate change," expedition leader Markus Rex of Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Ocean Research said ahead of the launch.


    A year in the ice: Scientists set sail on Arctic expeditionAn international team of researchers set off Friday on the biggest and most complex expedition ever attempted in the central Arctic, a yearlong journey they hope will sharpen the scientific models that underpin human understanding of climate change. The 140-million euro ($158 million) expedition into the ice will see 600 scientists from 19 countries, including Germany, the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China, work together in one of the most inhospitable regions of the planet. "The Arctic is the epicenter of global climate change," expedition leader Markus Rex of Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Ocean Research said ahead of the launch.


     

  • Can you get cancer from tap water? New study says even 'safe' drinking water poses risk      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 14:08:27 -0400

    Can you get cancer from tap water? New study says even 'safe' drinking water poses riskAn Environmental Working Group study suggests that 22 carcinogens found in tap water — including arsenic — could result in over 100,000 cancer cases.


    Can you get cancer from tap water? New study says even 'safe' drinking water poses riskAn Environmental Working Group study suggests that 22 carcinogens found in tap water — including arsenic — could result in over 100,000 cancer cases.


     

  • Chernobyl's 'sarcophagus' is getting dismantled because it's teetering on collapse. Photos reveal the structure's rise and fall.      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 10:07:25 -0400

    Chernobyl's 'sarcophagus' is getting dismantled because it's teetering on collapse. Photos reveal the structure's rise and fall.More than 33 years after the Chernobyl disaster, workers have to dismantle the protective sarcophagus before it comes tumbling down.


    Chernobyl's 'sarcophagus' is getting dismantled because it's teetering on collapse. Photos reveal the structure's rise and fall.More than 33 years after the Chernobyl disaster, workers have to dismantle the protective sarcophagus before it comes tumbling down.


     

  • Scientists Identify Neurons That Help the Brain Forget      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 08:39:47 -0400

    Scientists Identify Neurons That Help the Brain ForgetOne afternoon in April 1929, a journalist from a Moscow newspaper turned up in Alexander Luria's office with an unusual problem: He never forgot things.Luria, a neuropsychologist, proceeded to test the man, who later became known as subject S., by spouting long strings of numbers and words, foreign poems and scientific formulas, all of which S. recited back without fail. Decades later, S. still remembered the lists of numbers perfectly whenever Luria retested him.But S.'s ability to remember was also a hindrance in everyday life. He had a hard time understanding abstract concepts or figurative language, and he was terrible at recognizing faces because he had memorized them at an exact point in time, with specific facial expressions and features. The ability to forget, scientists eventually came to realize, was just as vital as the ability to remember."We're inundated with so much information every day, and much of that information is turned into memories in the brain," said Ronald Davis, a neurobiologist at the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida. "We simply cannot deal with all of it."Researchers like Davis argue that forgetting is an active mechanism that the brain employs to clear out unnecessary pieces of information so we can retain new ones. Others have gone a step further, suggesting that forgetting is required for the mental flexibility inherent in creative thinking and imagination.A new paper, published Thursday in the journal Science, points to a group of neurons in the brain that may be responsible for helping the brain to forget. Akihiro Yamanaka, a neuroscientist at Nagoya University in Japan, and his team stumbled across the cells, known as melanin-concentrating hormone, or MCH, neurons, while studying sleep regulation in mice.Unlike most of the brain's neurons, which are active when animals are awake, MCH neurons in the hypothalamus start firing electrical signals most actively when a sleeping animal is in a stage called REM sleep. This phase of sleep is characterized by rapid eye movement, an elevated pulse, unique brain waves and, in humans, vivid dreams. When the researchers tracked MCH signals in mice, they found that the cells were suppressing neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region known to play a role in the consolidation of memory.To evaluate the effects of the MCH neurons on memory, the researchers used genetic tools to turn MCH neurons on and off before mice performed some memory tests. First, the researchers presented the mice with a tiny plastic banana and a wooden toy to explore side by side. After each animal sniffed out both items, the researchers artificially activated or inhibited its MCH neurons. Then they put each mouse back in the test cage, where one of the toys had been swapped out for a new item.To the scientists' surprise, "turning on" MCH cells during the retention period worsened memory; the mice did not remember which toys they had already seen and smelled. They approached the familiar wooden or plastic toy with the same frequency as the new one. But mice that had their MCH neurons artificially suppressed were more likely to play with the new item, indicating that they had formed stronger memories of the initial items and did not need to explore them again.The change in behavior was so obvious that researchers could tell just by observing the mice which ones had their MCH neurons suppressed. And the effects were visible only if the MCH neurons were inhibited during REM sleep; inhibiting the cells while the mice were awake or during a different part of the sleep cycle did not improve their performance on the memory test."These results suggest that hypothalamic MCH neurons help the brain actively forget new information that is not important," Yamanaka said. And because the neurons are most active during REM sleep, they may explain why humans usually do not remember their dreams when they wake up. "The neurons may be clearing up memory resources for the next day," Yamanaka said.But there are likely to be many processes regulating how and when the brain forgets, just as there is with recollection."As we learn, and as other animals learn throughout the day, various forgetting mechanisms may always be slowly eroding memory," Davis said. Changes in the firing pattern of neurons, the weakening of synapses and the generation of new neurons in the brain have all been shown to contribute to some level of memory loss.Davis' studies in fruit flies indicate that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in both forming and forgetting memories. His theory is that after a memory is formed, the slow, continual release of additional dopamine triggers a cascade of biochemical reactions in the neurons that store the memory, and that this eventually removes the memory unless another brain mechanism deems it important and intervenes."If the memory is really important to the organism, or to us as humans, then this attention or emotional interest will come in and act like a judge, telling the brain, 'Keep this one, protect it,'" Davis said.It would make sense that the regions and mechanisms in the brain that are involved in memory formation are also connected to memory removal, Davis said. If you wanted to make changes to your house -- by painting a room, say -- and a few months or years later you decided to adopt a trendy new color, you would first go back and strip out the old paint.But we are far from the day, if it ever comes, when traumatic memories can be erased or sunny ones are made easier to recall, Yamanaka said. For now, such possibilities belong to the realm of movies like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


    Scientists Identify Neurons That Help the Brain ForgetOne afternoon in April 1929, a journalist from a Moscow newspaper turned up in Alexander Luria's office with an unusual problem: He never forgot things.Luria, a neuropsychologist, proceeded to test the man, who later became known as subject S., by spouting long strings of numbers and words, foreign poems and scientific formulas, all of which S. recited back without fail. Decades later, S. still remembered the lists of numbers perfectly whenever Luria retested him.But S.'s ability to remember was also a hindrance in everyday life. He had a hard time understanding abstract concepts or figurative language, and he was terrible at recognizing faces because he had memorized them at an exact point in time, with specific facial expressions and features. The ability to forget, scientists eventually came to realize, was just as vital as the ability to remember."We're inundated with so much information every day, and much of that information is turned into memories in the brain," said Ronald Davis, a neurobiologist at the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida. "We simply cannot deal with all of it."Researchers like Davis argue that forgetting is an active mechanism that the brain employs to clear out unnecessary pieces of information so we can retain new ones. Others have gone a step further, suggesting that forgetting is required for the mental flexibility inherent in creative thinking and imagination.A new paper, published Thursday in the journal Science, points to a group of neurons in the brain that may be responsible for helping the brain to forget. Akihiro Yamanaka, a neuroscientist at Nagoya University in Japan, and his team stumbled across the cells, known as melanin-concentrating hormone, or MCH, neurons, while studying sleep regulation in mice.Unlike most of the brain's neurons, which are active when animals are awake, MCH neurons in the hypothalamus start firing electrical signals most actively when a sleeping animal is in a stage called REM sleep. This phase of sleep is characterized by rapid eye movement, an elevated pulse, unique brain waves and, in humans, vivid dreams. When the researchers tracked MCH signals in mice, they found that the cells were suppressing neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region known to play a role in the consolidation of memory.To evaluate the effects of the MCH neurons on memory, the researchers used genetic tools to turn MCH neurons on and off before mice performed some memory tests. First, the researchers presented the mice with a tiny plastic banana and a wooden toy to explore side by side. After each animal sniffed out both items, the researchers artificially activated or inhibited its MCH neurons. Then they put each mouse back in the test cage, where one of the toys had been swapped out for a new item.To the scientists' surprise, "turning on" MCH cells during the retention period worsened memory; the mice did not remember which toys they had already seen and smelled. They approached the familiar wooden or plastic toy with the same frequency as the new one. But mice that had their MCH neurons artificially suppressed were more likely to play with the new item, indicating that they had formed stronger memories of the initial items and did not need to explore them again.The change in behavior was so obvious that researchers could tell just by observing the mice which ones had their MCH neurons suppressed. And the effects were visible only if the MCH neurons were inhibited during REM sleep; inhibiting the cells while the mice were awake or during a different part of the sleep cycle did not improve their performance on the memory test."These results suggest that hypothalamic MCH neurons help the brain actively forget new information that is not important," Yamanaka said. And because the neurons are most active during REM sleep, they may explain why humans usually do not remember their dreams when they wake up. "The neurons may be clearing up memory resources for the next day," Yamanaka said.But there are likely to be many processes regulating how and when the brain forgets, just as there is with recollection."As we learn, and as other animals learn throughout the day, various forgetting mechanisms may always be slowly eroding memory," Davis said. Changes in the firing pattern of neurons, the weakening of synapses and the generation of new neurons in the brain have all been shown to contribute to some level of memory loss.Davis' studies in fruit flies indicate that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in both forming and forgetting memories. His theory is that after a memory is formed, the slow, continual release of additional dopamine triggers a cascade of biochemical reactions in the neurons that store the memory, and that this eventually removes the memory unless another brain mechanism deems it important and intervenes."If the memory is really important to the organism, or to us as humans, then this attention or emotional interest will come in and act like a judge, telling the brain, 'Keep this one, protect it,'" Davis said.It would make sense that the regions and mechanisms in the brain that are involved in memory formation are also connected to memory removal, Davis said. If you wanted to make changes to your house -- by painting a room, say -- and a few months or years later you decided to adopt a trendy new color, you would first go back and strip out the old paint.But we are far from the day, if it ever comes, when traumatic memories can be erased or sunny ones are made easier to recall, Yamanaka said. For now, such possibilities belong to the realm of movies like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


     

  • Before Area 51, the US' first 'UFO' controversy uncovered a top-secret military project      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 19:25:00 -0400

    Before Area 51, the US' first 'UFO' controversy uncovered a top-secret military projectThe plan to storm Area 51 is one chapter in a history of conspiracy theories about alien encounters. Before Area 51, there was Roswell, New Mexico.


    Before Area 51, the US' first 'UFO' controversy uncovered a top-secret military projectThe plan to storm Area 51 is one chapter in a history of conspiracy theories about alien encounters. Before Area 51, there was Roswell, New Mexico.


     

  • 'Largest polar expedition in history' to probe Arctic climate      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 13:50:04 -0400

    'Largest polar expedition in history' to probe Arctic climateA team of scientists from 19 countries will set off for the Arctic on Friday, aiming to freeze their ship into the polar ice for a year to research the changing climate. The 140 million-euro ($155 million) mission will study the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, ecosystem and natural processes -- looking to build a picture of how climate change is affecting the region and the entire world. "No other region of the world has warmed as quickly as the Arctic in the past decades," mission leader and atmospheric scientist Markus Rex said on the "Mosaic" (Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate) website.


    'Largest polar expedition in history' to probe Arctic climateA team of scientists from 19 countries will set off for the Arctic on Friday, aiming to freeze their ship into the polar ice for a year to research the changing climate. The 140 million-euro ($155 million) mission will study the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, ecosystem and natural processes -- looking to build a picture of how climate change is affecting the region and the entire world. "No other region of the world has warmed as quickly as the Arctic in the past decades," mission leader and atmospheric scientist Markus Rex said on the "Mosaic" (Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate) website.


     

  • How 16-year-old Greta Thunberg became the face of climate-change activism      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 07:04:00 -0400

    How 16-year-old Greta Thunberg became the face of climate-change activismGreta Thunberg has met with world leaders, led climate strikes, sailed across the Atlantic, and been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.


    How 16-year-old Greta Thunberg became the face of climate-change activismGreta Thunberg has met with world leaders, led climate strikes, sailed across the Atlantic, and been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.


     

  • Vitamin D deficiency linked with increased risk of death, particularly from diabetes: study      Fri, 20 Sep 2019 06:19:52 -0400

    Vitamin D deficiency linked with increased risk of death, particularly from diabetes: studyNew European research has found that individuals with low levels of vitamin D may have a higher risk of an early death, particularly if they have diabetes. Carried out by researchers at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, the new study looked at data gathered from 78,581 patients with an average age of 51 who had blood tests taken to measure the levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D), more commonly known as vitamin D. A vitamin D level of 50 nmol/L, which is the commonly used cut-off value for vitamin D deficiency, was used in the study as a reference value for comparing other vitamin D levels.


    Vitamin D deficiency linked with increased risk of death, particularly from diabetes: studyNew European research has found that individuals with low levels of vitamin D may have a higher risk of an early death, particularly if they have diabetes. Carried out by researchers at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, the new study looked at data gathered from 78,581 patients with an average age of 51 who had blood tests taken to measure the levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D), more commonly known as vitamin D. A vitamin D level of 50 nmol/L, which is the commonly used cut-off value for vitamin D deficiency, was used in the study as a reference value for comparing other vitamin D levels.


     

  • San Francisco's dirtiest street has an outdoor drug market, discarded heroin needles, and piles of poop on the sidewalk      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 20:23:20 -0400

    San Francisco's dirtiest street has an outdoor drug market, discarded heroin needles, and piles of poop on the sidewalkResidents of Hyde Street's 300 block report having to hose down urine in front of their offices or hold their breath to avoid the stench of feces.


    San Francisco's dirtiest street has an outdoor drug market, discarded heroin needles, and piles of poop on the sidewalkResidents of Hyde Street's 300 block report having to hose down urine in front of their offices or hold their breath to avoid the stench of feces.


     

  • There are 3 billion fewer birds in North America than there were in 1970      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 17:32:19 -0400

    There are 3 billion fewer birds in North America than there were in 1970North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds since 1970, a study says. It found significant population declines among hundreds of bird species.


    There are 3 billion fewer birds in North America than there were in 1970North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds since 1970, a study says. It found significant population declines among hundreds of bird species.


     

  • The mysterious spate of vape-related deaths and illnesses continues to grow, confounding experts. Here's what officials knew and when.      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 17:09:00 -0400

    The mysterious spate of vape-related deaths and illnesses continues to grow, confounding experts. Here's what officials knew and when.The CDC said there were 530 confirmed and probable cases of vape-related illnesses in 38 US states on Thursday. The illnesses have led to 8 deaths.


    The mysterious spate of vape-related deaths and illnesses continues to grow, confounding experts. Here's what officials knew and when.The CDC said there were 530 confirmed and probable cases of vape-related illnesses in 38 US states on Thursday. The illnesses have led to 8 deaths.


     

  • North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds in the last 50 years — another sign that we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinction      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 14:00:00 -0400

    North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds in the last 50 years — another sign that we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinctionA new study found that there's been a 29% decline in bird populations in the US and Canada since 1970.


    North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds in the last 50 years — another sign that we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinctionA new study found that there's been a 29% decline in bird populations in the US and Canada since 1970.


     

  • Officials just confirmed 7 deaths and 530 cases of serious lung disease tied to vaping. Here are all the health risks you should know about.      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 12:13:00 -0400

    Officials just confirmed 7 deaths and 530 cases of serious lung disease tied to vaping. Here are all the health risks you should know about.Investigators don't know the cause and haven't identified a single common brand or drug across all of the cases. Here's what you need to know.


    Officials just confirmed 7 deaths and 530 cases of serious lung disease tied to vaping. Here are all the health risks you should know about.Investigators don't know the cause and haven't identified a single common brand or drug across all of the cases. Here's what you need to know.


     

  • U.S. Cities Among the Most Surveilled in the World: Study      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:06:00 -0400

    U.S. Cities Among the Most Surveilled in the World: StudyWhat's the role of Silicon Valley?


    U.S. Cities Among the Most Surveilled in the World: StudyWhat's the role of Silicon Valley?


     

  • New study links anemia in early pregnancy to higher autism risk in children      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 09:20:31 -0400

    New study links anemia in early pregnancy to higher autism risk in childrenNew European research has found that women who suffer from anemia in early pregnancy, a condition which is usually more common in late pregnancy, may give birth to children who have a higher risk of autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Carried out by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, the new study looked at 532,232 Swedish children and their 299,768 mothers to look at what effect the timing of an anemia diagnosis during pregnancy had on the fetus's neurodevelopment.


    New study links anemia in early pregnancy to higher autism risk in childrenNew European research has found that women who suffer from anemia in early pregnancy, a condition which is usually more common in late pregnancy, may give birth to children who have a higher risk of autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Carried out by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, the new study looked at 532,232 Swedish children and their 299,768 mothers to look at what effect the timing of an anemia diagnosis during pregnancy had on the fetus's neurodevelopment.


     

  • Post-menopausal women should monitor their cholesterol levels says new study      Thu, 19 Sep 2019 05:53:13 -0400

    Post-menopausal women should monitor their cholesterol levels says new studyAustralian researchers are advising post-menopausal women to keep an eye on their cholesterol, after finding that levels appear to increase after menopause. Carried out by researchers from the Australian National University (ANU), the new study analyzed 66 studies which looked at cholesterol levels of 68,394 pre-menopausal women and 46,261 post-menopausal, a total of 114,655 participants. The findings, published in the journal Menopause, showed that post-menopausal women had significantly higher cholesterol levels than pre-menopausal women, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol which helps transport fat molecules around the body.


    Post-menopausal women should monitor their cholesterol levels says new studyAustralian researchers are advising post-menopausal women to keep an eye on their cholesterol, after finding that levels appear to increase after menopause. Carried out by researchers from the Australian National University (ANU), the new study analyzed 66 studies which looked at cholesterol levels of 68,394 pre-menopausal women and 46,261 post-menopausal, a total of 114,655 participants. The findings, published in the journal Menopause, showed that post-menopausal women had significantly higher cholesterol levels than pre-menopausal women, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol which helps transport fat molecules around the body.


     

  • Something killed 121 gray whales this summer. Scientists are scrambling to find out what      Wed, 18 Sep 2019 19:23:52 -0400

    Something killed 121 gray whales this summer. Scientists are scrambling to find out whatSomething killed 121 gray whales this summer, and scientists struggle to find out what it was. Many were emaciated and appeared to be starving.


    Something killed 121 gray whales this summer. Scientists are scrambling to find out whatSomething killed 121 gray whales this summer, and scientists struggle to find out what it was. Many were emaciated and appeared to be starving.


     

  • This neutron star is 'almost too massive to exist,' Astronomers say in new study      Wed, 18 Sep 2019 18:04:28 -0400

    This neutron star is 'almost too massive to exist,' Astronomers say in new studyAstronomers have measured a neutron star that is so massive it's "teetering on the edge of existence."


    This neutron star is 'almost too massive to exist,' Astronomers say in new studyAstronomers have measured a neutron star that is so massive it's "teetering on the edge of existence."


     

  • US abortion rate is at its lowest, but restrictive laws aren't the likely cause, study says      Wed, 18 Sep 2019 13:41:06 -0400

    US abortion rate is at its lowest, but restrictive laws aren't the likely cause, study saysA study says the number of abortions in the USA has fallen to the lowest level since 1973, citing a decrease in pregnancies.


    US abortion rate is at its lowest, but restrictive laws aren't the likely cause, study saysA study says the number of abortions in the USA has fallen to the lowest level since 1973, citing a decrease in pregnancies.


     

  • A lost 8th continent is hidden nearly 1,000 miles under Europe, new research shows. Scientists named it 'Greater Adria.'      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 19:37:42 -0400

    A lost 8th continent is hidden nearly 1,000 miles under Europe, new research shows. Scientists named it 'Greater Adria.'Millions of years ago, the supercontinent Pangea broke up into land masses that became modern-day continents. One continent was buried under Europe.


    A lost 8th continent is hidden nearly 1,000 miles under Europe, new research shows. Scientists named it 'Greater Adria.'Millions of years ago, the supercontinent Pangea broke up into land masses that became modern-day continents. One continent was buried under Europe.


     

  • One in 16 American women forced into first sexual encounter: study      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 16:50:24 -0400

    One in 16 American women forced into first sexual encounter: studyOne in 16 American women were either forced or coerced into their first sexual encounter, according to a study investigating the long-term negative impacts of such "trauma" on women's health. In the US, "the #MeToo movement has highlighted how frequently women experience sexual violence," the researchers wrote in the introduction. Published Monday in the American Medical Association's peer-reviewed journal (JAMA Internal Medicine), the study is based on a sample of more than 13,000 women aged 18 to 44, who were interviewed as part of a survey conducted between 2011 and 2017 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


    One in 16 American women forced into first sexual encounter: studyOne in 16 American women were either forced or coerced into their first sexual encounter, according to a study investigating the long-term negative impacts of such "trauma" on women's health. In the US, "the #MeToo movement has highlighted how frequently women experience sexual violence," the researchers wrote in the introduction. Published Monday in the American Medical Association's peer-reviewed journal (JAMA Internal Medicine), the study is based on a sample of more than 13,000 women aged 18 to 44, who were interviewed as part of a survey conducted between 2011 and 2017 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).


     

  • Black carbon from air pollution found in placentas: study      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 16:49:33 -0400

    Black carbon from air pollution found in placentas: studyBlack carbon particles typically emitted by vehicle exhaust and coal-fired power plants have been detected on the foetus-facing side of placentas, researchers said Tuesday. The concentration of particles was highest in the placentas of women most exposed to airborn pollutants in their daily life, according to a study in Nature Communications. "Our study provides compelling evidence for the presence of black carbon particles originating from air pollution in human placenta," the authors said.


    Black carbon from air pollution found in placentas: studyBlack carbon particles typically emitted by vehicle exhaust and coal-fired power plants have been detected on the foetus-facing side of placentas, researchers said Tuesday. The concentration of particles was highest in the placentas of women most exposed to airborn pollutants in their daily life, according to a study in Nature Communications. "Our study provides compelling evidence for the presence of black carbon particles originating from air pollution in human placenta," the authors said.


     

  • Space Talent puts jobs at Blue Origin, SpaceX and elsewhere in one big database      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 13:43:48 -0400

    Space Talent puts jobs at Blue Origin, SpaceX and elsewhere in one big databaseJeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and Elon Musk's SpaceX are often at odds, but there's at least one place where those two space-industry rivals are on the same page: the newly unveiled Space Talent job database. The search engine for careers in the space industry is a project of Space Angels, a nationwide network designed to link angel investors with space entrepreneurs. "If you've ever considered working in space, this jobs board has 3,000 reasons to make the leap," Space Angels CEO Chad Anderson said in a tweet. The database aggregates job postings from Blue Origin and SpaceX as… Read More


    Space Talent puts jobs at Blue Origin, SpaceX and elsewhere in one big databaseJeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and Elon Musk's SpaceX are often at odds, but there's at least one place where those two space-industry rivals are on the same page: the newly unveiled Space Talent job database. The search engine for careers in the space industry is a project of Space Angels, a nationwide network designed to link angel investors with space entrepreneurs. "If you've ever considered working in space, this jobs board has 3,000 reasons to make the leap," Space Angels CEO Chad Anderson said in a tweet. The database aggregates job postings from Blue Origin and SpaceX as… Read More


     

  • Kanye West tried to build 'Star Wars'-inspired domes for the homeless, but LA officials just forced him to tear them down      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 08:40:00 -0400

    Kanye West tried to build 'Star Wars'-inspired domes for the homeless, but LA officials just forced him to tear them downKanye West reportedly did not secure the necessary permits for the futuristic housing project he constructed on his property in Calabasas, California.


    Kanye West tried to build 'Star Wars'-inspired domes for the homeless, but LA officials just forced him to tear them downKanye West reportedly did not secure the necessary permits for the futuristic housing project he constructed on his property in Calabasas, California.


     

  • A gas explosion ripped through a Russian lab storing deadly diseases like smallpox, anthrax, and Ebola      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 05:58:42 -0400

    A gas explosion ripped through a Russian lab storing deadly diseases like smallpox, anthrax, and EbolaA gas cylinder at a major Russian research lab known as Vector exploded in a sanitary inspection room and caused a fire on Monday.


    A gas explosion ripped through a Russian lab storing deadly diseases like smallpox, anthrax, and EbolaA gas cylinder at a major Russian research lab known as Vector exploded in a sanitary inspection room and caused a fire on Monday.


     

  • New study finds that a vegan diet could boost gut microbes related to body weight and blood sugar control      Tue, 17 Sep 2019 05:53:22 -0400

    New study finds that a vegan diet could boost gut microbes related to body weight and blood sugar controlA new small-scale study has found evidence to suggest that following a vegan diet could boost levels of the microbes in our gut, which are related to improvements in body weight, body composition and blood sugar control. The participants were randomly placed into two groups, with 73 told to follow a low-fat vegan diet for 16 weeks, while the remaining 74 were told to make no changes to their diet. At the beginning of the study and at the end of the 16 weeks, the researchers assessed the gut microbiota composition, body composition, and insulin sensitivity.


    New study finds that a vegan diet could boost gut microbes related to body weight and blood sugar controlA new small-scale study has found evidence to suggest that following a vegan diet could boost levels of the microbes in our gut, which are related to improvements in body weight, body composition and blood sugar control. The participants were randomly placed into two groups, with 73 told to follow a low-fat vegan diet for 16 weeks, while the remaining 74 were told to make no changes to their diet. At the beginning of the study and at the end of the 16 weeks, the researchers assessed the gut microbiota composition, body composition, and insulin sensitivity.


     

  • Scientists slash the upper limit for the neutrino’s mysterious mass in half      Mon, 16 Sep 2019 22:10:21 -0400

    Scientists slash the upper limit for the neutrino’s mysterious mass in halfScientists from the University of Washington and other institutions around the world say they've reduced the upper limit for the mass of the neutrino by half. Thanks to findings from the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment, or KATRIN, physicists now know to a 90% confidence level that the neutrino has a rest mass no greater than 1.1 electron volts, or 1.1 eV. The previous upper limit was 2 eV. Nailing down the neutrino's mass could solidify scientists' grasp on the Standard Model, which describes the subatomic world in fine detail. It could also open a path to the mysterious realm beyond… Read More


    Scientists slash the upper limit for the neutrino’s mysterious mass in halfScientists from the University of Washington and other institutions around the world say they've reduced the upper limit for the mass of the neutrino by half. Thanks to findings from the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment, or KATRIN, physicists now know to a 90% confidence level that the neutrino has a rest mass no greater than 1.1 electron volts, or 1.1 eV. The previous upper limit was 2 eV. Nailing down the neutrino's mass could solidify scientists' grasp on the Standard Model, which describes the subatomic world in fine detail. It could also open a path to the mysterious realm beyond… Read More


     

  • SpaceX wants to rearrange its Starlink satellites for faster broadband ramp-up      Mon, 16 Sep 2019 20:21:19 -0400

    SpaceX wants to rearrange its Starlink satellites for faster broadband ramp-upSpaceX is seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commission for changes in the spacing of its Starlink broadband satellites, in order to extend internet services to a wider swath of the United States on a faster timetable. "This adjustment will accelerate coverage to southern states and U.S. territories, potentially expediting coverage to the southern continental United States by the end of the next hurricane season and reaching other U.S. territories by the following hurricane season," SpaceX said in an application filed on Aug. 30 and accepted last week. If SpaceX follows that schedule, Starlink coverage could be available throughout the… Read More


    SpaceX wants to rearrange its Starlink satellites for faster broadband ramp-upSpaceX is seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commission for changes in the spacing of its Starlink broadband satellites, in order to extend internet services to a wider swath of the United States on a faster timetable. "This adjustment will accelerate coverage to southern states and U.S. territories, potentially expediting coverage to the southern continental United States by the end of the next hurricane season and reaching other U.S. territories by the following hurricane season," SpaceX said in an application filed on Aug. 30 and accepted last week. If SpaceX follows that schedule, Starlink coverage could be available throughout the… Read More


     

  • Haunting photos reveal what nuclear-disaster ghost towns look like years after being abandoned      Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:14:00 -0400

    Haunting photos reveal what nuclear-disaster ghost towns look like years after being abandonedPhotos of abandoned nuclear ghost towns, like Namie, Japan, reveal abandoned cars and dilapidated buildings.


    Haunting photos reveal what nuclear-disaster ghost towns look like years after being abandonedPhotos of abandoned nuclear ghost towns, like Namie, Japan, reveal abandoned cars and dilapidated buildings.


     

  • A new image of a mysterious object careening toward our solar system strongly suggests it's the first comet from another star system      Mon, 16 Sep 2019 15:25:00 -0400

    A new image of a mysterious object careening toward our solar system strongly suggests it's the first comet from another star systemC/2019 Q4 is likely the first comet ever detected that came from another star system. Our clearest image of it shows its dust cloud and gas tail.


    A new image of a mysterious object careening toward our solar system strongly suggests it's the first comet from another star systemC/2019 Q4 is likely the first comet ever detected that came from another star system. Our clearest image of it shows its dust cloud and gas tail.


     

  • Brad Pitt coaxes a thumbs-up for his ‘Ad Astra’ movie in hookup with space station      Mon, 16 Sep 2019 13:53:36 -0400

    Brad Pitt coaxes a thumbs-up for his ‘Ad Astra’ movie in hookup with space stationImagine the taglines in the movie ads: "Really good" portrayal of zero-gravity! "Absolutely" better than George Clooney! There'd be some justification for Brad Pitt's space movie, "Ad Astra," to use those lines after today's Earth-to-space video call between the A-list Hollywood star and NASA astronaut Nick Hague, who's finishing up a six-month tour of duty on the International Space Station. Pitt said the linkup, arranged through NASA, was a "real treat." And he didn't waste any time getting a film review from Hague, who watched an advance screening of "Ad Astra" with his crewmates on the station. "Now that I… Read More


    Brad Pitt coaxes a thumbs-up for his ‘Ad Astra’ movie in hookup with space stationImagine the taglines in the movie ads: "Really good" portrayal of zero-gravity! "Absolutely" better than George Clooney! There'd be some justification for Brad Pitt's space movie, "Ad Astra," to use those lines after today's Earth-to-space video call between the A-list Hollywood star and NASA astronaut Nick Hague, who's finishing up a six-month tour of duty on the International Space Station. Pitt said the linkup, arranged through NASA, was a "real treat." And he didn't waste any time getting a film review from Hague, who watched an advance screening of "Ad Astra" with his crewmates on the station. "Now that I… Read More


     

  • Study: Drug Dealers Slinging Steroids on Social Media      Mon, 16 Sep 2019 13:52:00 -0400

    Study: Drug Dealers Slinging Steroids on Social MediaFacebook, Twitter, and YouTube are all hotspots for the illegal drug.


    Study: Drug Dealers Slinging Steroids on Social MediaFacebook, Twitter, and YouTube are all hotspots for the illegal drug.


     

  • Ocean heatwave known as 'The Blob' is warming up the West Coast – and endangering animals      Sun, 15 Sep 2019 15:14:29 -0400

    Ocean heatwave known as 'The Blob' is warming up the West Coast – and endangering animals'The Blob' covers an area of 4 million square miles, or three times the size of Alaska. It could result in the death of sea lions and salmon


    Ocean heatwave known as 'The Blob' is warming up the West Coast – and endangering animals'The Blob' covers an area of 4 million square miles, or three times the size of Alaska. It could result in the death of sea lions and salmon


     

  • SESAME synchrotron sheds new light on Middle Eastern science, history and politics      Sun, 15 Sep 2019 14:30:46 -0400

    SESAME synchrotron sheds new light on Middle Eastern science, history and politicsGeekWire's Alan Boyle reports on a $90 million science project with a diplomatic twist in Jordan, one of the stops on this summer's Middle East science tour.  ALLAN, Jordan — For Israeli researchers, SESAME could open up a path for finding out exactly what the frankincense mentioned in the Bible was made of. For Arab researchers, SESAME could reveal how the awe-inspiring structures built thousands of years ago at Jordan's Petra archaeological site were decorated. And what's nearly as awesome as the potential discoveries is the fact that Israelis and Arabs are working together at SESAME to make them. So… Read More


    SESAME synchrotron sheds new light on Middle Eastern science, history and politicsGeekWire's Alan Boyle reports on a $90 million science project with a diplomatic twist in Jordan, one of the stops on this summer's Middle East science tour.  ALLAN, Jordan — For Israeli researchers, SESAME could open up a path for finding out exactly what the frankincense mentioned in the Bible was made of. For Arab researchers, SESAME could reveal how the awe-inspiring structures built thousands of years ago at Jordan's Petra archaeological site were decorated. And what's nearly as awesome as the potential discoveries is the fact that Israelis and Arabs are working together at SESAME to make them. So… Read More


     

  • How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: Getting the Atomic Bomb First?      Sun, 15 Sep 2019 11:00:00 -0400

    How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: Getting the Atomic Bomb First?But it never happened. This is the reason why.


    How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: Getting the Atomic Bomb First?But it never happened. This is the reason why.


     

  • In the event of a killer asteroid, volcanic apocalypse, or nuclear holocaust, mushrooms could save humanity from extinction      Sun, 15 Sep 2019 09:34:00 -0400

    In the event of a killer asteroid, volcanic apocalypse, or nuclear holocaust, mushrooms could save humanity from extinctionHuman survivors of an apocalyptic catastrophe could start a new food system with mushrooms. The other food options might not be as appetizing.


    In the event of a killer asteroid, volcanic apocalypse, or nuclear holocaust, mushrooms could save humanity from extinctionHuman survivors of an apocalyptic catastrophe could start a new food system with mushrooms. The other food options might not be as appetizing.


     

  • The Most Influential Scientist You May Never Have Heard Of      Sat, 14 Sep 2019 20:30:00 -0400

    The Most Influential Scientist You May Never Have Heard OfThroughout his life, Alexander von Humboldt sought out the world’s interconnections.


    The Most Influential Scientist You May Never Have Heard OfThroughout his life, Alexander von Humboldt sought out the world’s interconnections.


     

  • Is Juul Making It Easy for Kids to Vape in School? New Study Suggests Yes      Sat, 14 Sep 2019 17:04:00 -0400

    Is Juul Making It Easy for Kids to Vape in School? New Study Suggests YesYoung people may be vaping during school, a study of Twitter posts suggests.


    Is Juul Making It Easy for Kids to Vape in School? New Study Suggests YesYoung people may be vaping during school, a study of Twitter posts suggests.


     

  • Speaking four or more languages could reduce the risk of dementia finds new study      Fri, 13 Sep 2019 11:02:13 -0400

    Speaking four or more languages could reduce the risk of dementia finds new studyNew Canadian research has found that having a strong ability for learning languages may help to reduce an individual's risk of developing dementia. Carried out by researchers at the University of Waterloo, the new study looked at 325 Roman Catholic nuns in the United States who were taking part in the larger, internationally recognized Nun Study, which is a longitudinal study of religious sisters aged 75 and over. The findings, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, showed that just six percent of the nuns who spoke four or more languages developed dementia, compared to 31 percent of those who only spoke one language.


    Speaking four or more languages could reduce the risk of dementia finds new studyNew Canadian research has found that having a strong ability for learning languages may help to reduce an individual's risk of developing dementia. Carried out by researchers at the University of Waterloo, the new study looked at 325 Roman Catholic nuns in the United States who were taking part in the larger, internationally recognized Nun Study, which is a longitudinal study of religious sisters aged 75 and over. The findings, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, showed that just six percent of the nuns who spoke four or more languages developed dementia, compared to 31 percent of those who only spoke one language.


     

  • One fifth of injured US cyclists were not wearing a helmet finds new study      Fri, 13 Sep 2019 09:45:42 -0400

    One fifth of injured US cyclists were not wearing a helmet finds new studyA new large-scale US study has found that around one in five cyclists who are injured while on their bike are not wearing a helmet, with men and ethnic minorities the least likely to wear a cycle helmet to protect themselves. Led by researchers at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science, and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the new study looked at data from the 2002-2012 National Trauma Data Bank, which included information on 76,032 bicyclists (81.1 percent of whom were male and 18.9 percent female) with head or neck injury. The researchers found that of these cyclists, only 22 percent of adults wore a helmet.


    One fifth of injured US cyclists were not wearing a helmet finds new studyA new large-scale US study has found that around one in five cyclists who are injured while on their bike are not wearing a helmet, with men and ethnic minorities the least likely to wear a cycle helmet to protect themselves. Led by researchers at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science, and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the new study looked at data from the 2002-2012 National Trauma Data Bank, which included information on 76,032 bicyclists (81.1 percent of whom were male and 18.9 percent female) with head or neck injury. The researchers found that of these cyclists, only 22 percent of adults wore a helmet.


     

  • America Might Soon Have a New Way To Kill Russian or North Korean ICBMs      Fri, 13 Sep 2019 06:02:00 -0400

    America Might Soon Have a New Way To Kill Russian or North Korean ICBMsAI could be a game-changer.


    America Might Soon Have a New Way To Kill Russian or North Korean ICBMsAI could be a game-changer.


     

  • Could drinking tea boost brain health?      Fri, 13 Sep 2019 05:48:47 -0400

    Could drinking tea boost brain health?New research has found, for the first time, evidence to suggest that drinking tea could have a positive effect on the structure of the brain, possibly helping to protect against cognitive decline as we age. The participants were classified into two groups according to how much they drank green tea, oolong tea, and black tea around age 45 and now. All participants underwent neuropsychological tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure their cognitive functioning and look at their brain structure.


    Could drinking tea boost brain health?New research has found, for the first time, evidence to suggest that drinking tea could have a positive effect on the structure of the brain, possibly helping to protect against cognitive decline as we age. The participants were classified into two groups according to how much they drank green tea, oolong tea, and black tea around age 45 and now. All participants underwent neuropsychological tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure their cognitive functioning and look at their brain structure.


     

  • Bigelow Aerospace and NASA test earthly mockup of interplanetary space station      Thu, 12 Sep 2019 19:48:00 -0400

    Bigelow Aerospace and NASA test earthly mockup of interplanetary space stationBigelow Aerospace opened up its ground-based prototype for a space station module — or perhaps even a Mars transport habitat — for inspection today at its headquarters in North Las Vegas. The open house centered on the Mars Transporter Testing Unit, an all-steel mockup of the company's expandable, fabric-covered B330 space module. For two weeks, a NASA-Bigelow team will be testing the suitability of the B330 concept for crewed deep-space missions. Bigelow's prototype is one of six ground-based demonstration projects funded as part of NASA's NextSTEP-2 program. The other companies building full-sized NextSTEP-2 prototypes for space habitats include Boeing, Lockheed… Read More


    Bigelow Aerospace and NASA test earthly mockup of interplanetary space stationBigelow Aerospace opened up its ground-based prototype for a space station module — or perhaps even a Mars transport habitat — for inspection today at its headquarters in North Las Vegas. The open house centered on the Mars Transporter Testing Unit, an all-steel mockup of the company's expandable, fabric-covered B330 space module. For two weeks, a NASA-Bigelow team will be testing the suitability of the B330 concept for crewed deep-space missions. Bigelow's prototype is one of six ground-based demonstration projects funded as part of NASA's NextSTEP-2 program. The other companies building full-sized NextSTEP-2 prototypes for space habitats include Boeing, Lockheed… Read More


     

  • NASA says a new comet is likely an 'interstellar visitor' from another star system — the second ever detected      Thu, 12 Sep 2019 17:10:00 -0400

    NASA says a new comet is likely an 'interstellar visitor' from another star system — the second ever detectedIf the comet-like object has interstellar origins, "it's the next best thing to sending a probe to a different solar system," one astronomer said.


    NASA says a new comet is likely an 'interstellar visitor' from another star system — the second ever detectedIf the comet-like object has interstellar origins, "it's the next best thing to sending a probe to a different solar system," one astronomer said.


     

  • Preparing for a Space War, the Air Force Hardens Its Satellites      Thu, 12 Sep 2019 14:00:00 -0400

    Preparing for a Space War, the Air Force Hardens Its SatellitesRussia and China are doing it too.


    Preparing for a Space War, the Air Force Hardens Its SatellitesRussia and China are doing it too.


     

  • Help wanted: U.S. government is seeking advice from quantum computing experts      Wed, 11 Sep 2019 22:41:58 -0400

    Help wanted: U.S. government is seeking advice from quantum computing expertsThe U.S. Department of Energy is looking for experts to guide the White House and federal agencies through the weird world of quantum information science. Today's solicitation seeks nominations to the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee, a panel that gets its mandate from legislation that President Donald Trump signed into law last December. In addition to calling for the establishment of the advisory committee, the National Quantum Initiative Act sets aside $1.2 billion over five years to support research, development and workforce training relating to quantum information science. Quantum approaches to information processing are expected to bring dramatic changes to… Read More


    Help wanted: U.S. government is seeking advice from quantum computing expertsThe U.S. Department of Energy is looking for experts to guide the White House and federal agencies through the weird world of quantum information science. Today's solicitation seeks nominations to the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee, a panel that gets its mandate from legislation that President Donald Trump signed into law last December. In addition to calling for the establishment of the advisory committee, the National Quantum Initiative Act sets aside $1.2 billion over five years to support research, development and workforce training relating to quantum information science. Quantum approaches to information processing are expected to bring dramatic changes to… Read More


     

  • How Nine Days Underwater Helps Scientists Understand What Life on a Moon Base Will Be Like      Wed, 11 Sep 2019 21:30:00 -0400

    How Nine Days Underwater Helps Scientists Understand What Life on a Moon Base Will Be LikeThese data should help NASA find ways that astronauts and aquanauts can improve physical and mental performance, while protecting the brain, in both genders during future undersea and deep space exploration missions.


    How Nine Days Underwater Helps Scientists Understand What Life on a Moon Base Will Be LikeThese data should help NASA find ways that astronauts and aquanauts can improve physical and mental performance, while protecting the brain, in both genders during future undersea and deep space exploration missions.


     



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